LISTEN TO THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH TRANSPOSED ON VINYL RECORD.

“Can we hear the Earth? Not the sounds occurring upon it but the Earth on a geophysical scale? […]

[ Flat Earth Society – Art of Failure – 2008-2011 ]

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The hill-and-dale technique was used in Edison’s phonograph, recording sound with a stylus that vertically cut a minute landscape into the grooves of the cylinder. […]

FLAT EARTH SOCIETY from art of failure on Vimeo.

Flat earth society takes readings from the stylus of topographic radar, cuts them into vinyl and then plays them back with a stylus. Phonographic hills-and-dales grow into the Alps, Andes, Himalayas, Grand Canyon, Great Steppe, Great Rift Valley, Great Outback and the Lesser Antilles. Where Enrico Caruso and Nellie Melba once sang one hears the Baja Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula, and the bathymetric pauses of the Red Sea and Baffin Bay. […]

Peaks and valleys, spikes and wells, spires and troughs, aspirations and depressions, all have their gradations in mythical and actual landscapes.”
Douglas Kahn -> Read the full text:
issuu.com/artoffailure/docs/t0p0l0g1es

FLAT EARTH SOCIETY proposes a transposition of the earth elevation at the scale of a microgroove record. This engraving of elevation’s data on the surface of the disk generates in consequence a subtle image of the earth. When played on a turntable, the chain of elevation data crossed by the needle can be heard.
issuu.com/artoffailure/docs/flat-earth-society

artoffailure.org
(produced with Flo Kaufmann and the ArtKillArt label)

41_artoffailureexhibit2

From the earliest recorded archives to NOW, Sound Art finally makes it into MoMA! Including the work of Jacob Kirkegaard, with whom I recorded the first of my Transit Lounge Radio conversations, and who made the beautiful Golden Resonance remix of bridge sounds from my recordings of the Golden Gate Bridge.

“The diversity of these works echoes the complex and contested field of sound as art. Yet the exhibition posits something specific: that sound can elicit… modes of active, focused listening, and a heightened relationship between interior and exterior space. At a time when personal listening devices and tailored playlists have become ubiquitous, shared aural spaces are increasingly rare. Many of the artists in the exhibition aim for such realities, and the sound they create is decidedly social, immersing visitors and connecting them in space. In many of the works, links are drawn between disparate topographies and subjects, giving rise to new notions of place, time, and experience.”

MoMA_Soundings_Fusinato_2012_Mass-Black-300x210

Soundings: A Contemporary Score

August 10, 2013–November 03, 2013

Posted on April 3, 2013

Special Exhibitions gallery, third floor, and Various Locations

NEW YORK, April 5, 2013—The Museum of Modern Art’s first major exhibition of sound art, Soundings: A Contemporary Score, presents work by 16 of the most innovative contemporary artists working with sound.

While the artists in Soundings approach sound from a variety of angles—the visual arts, architecture, performance, computer programming, and music—they share an interest in working with, rather than against or independent of, a given situation or environment. These artistic responses range from architectural interventions to visualizations of otherwise inaudible sound to an exploration of how sound ricochets within a gallery to a range of field recordings including bats, abandoned buildings in Chernobyl, 59 bells in New York City, and a factory in Taiwan. Soundings is organized by Barbara London, Associate Curator, with Leora Morinis, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, MoMA.

The artists in the exhibition are Luke Fowler (Scottish, b. 1978), Toshiya Tsunoda (Japanese, b. 1964), Marco Fusinato (Australian, b. 1964), Richard Garet (Uruguayan, b. 1972), Florian Hecker (German, b. 1975), Christine Sun Kim (American, b. 1980), Jacob Kirkegaard (Danish, b. 1975), Haroon Mirza (British, b. 1977), Carsten Nicolai (German, b. 1965), Camille Norment (American, b. 1970), Tristan Perich (American, b. 1982), Susan Philipsz (Scottish, b. 1965), Sergei Tcherepnin (American, b. 1981), Hong-Kai Wang (Taiwanese, b. 1971), Jana Winderen (Norwegian, b. 1965), and Stephen Vitiello (American, b. 1964).

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with texts by Barbara London and writer Anne Hilde Neset, and an artists’ interview section coordinated by Leora Morinis.Soundings is also accompanied by evening music events, a film program, and a Sound Lab in The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building.

The exhibition is supported in part by the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA).

These are prints made on paper that are actual sound recordings. One, from 1806 is the “oldest known inscription of audio ‘waveforms,’ not recorded automatically but drawn by hand”. I have a project on hold with artkillart who first told me about the possibilities of printing an audio record onto paper/card, and finding this today reminded me that we still need to make that work. For now, listen and marvel at this extraordinary archive of audio preserved in book form.

Extracting Audio from Pictures

Patrick Feaster
POSTED BY  ⋅ 06/20/2012 ⋅ 9 COMMENTS

derhandschuh

This isn’t just a pretty picture.  It’s a bona fide sound recording—a “record.”  In fact, it might arguably be the oldest “record” in the world that you can listen to today!

Let me clarify—I don’t mean it’s the world’s oldest sound recording.  But nowadays when people use the word “record” colloquially to refer to sound media, they typically mean the specific format that includes LPs, 45s, and 78s—that is, the kinds of grooved disc you’d play on a “record player.” Technically, these “records” are based not on the phonograph Thomas Edison unveiled in 1877, but on the gramophone invented by Emile Berliner in 1887.  The gramophone disc dominated the worldwide recording industry for much of the twentieth century and still has currency in the twenty-first, for instance in the art of turntabling.  The distinctive crackle of its surface noise is stamped in the popular imagination as the quintessential “old recording” sound.

So what are the oldest known “records” in this sense—that is, the oldest known gramophone recordings, as opposed to the oldest sound recordings in general?  The first commercially available gramophone discs were manufactured and released in Europe in the summer of 1890, and numerous examples are available for listening (here, for example).  In addition to these, a few experimental gramophone discs from 1887 and 1888 survive at the Smithsonian Institution and elsewhere, but attempts to play these haven’t been very successful, and no intelligible or identifiable content has been recovered from them to date.  Finally, some other very old gramophone recordings have come down to us only in the form of prints made on paper,like the one on the fourth floor of Wells Library.  This isn’t a unique situation.  Many important early motion pictures that didn’t survive in the form of actual films were nevertheless preserved as paper prints deposited for copyright registration purposes with the Library of Congress and later retransferred to film for projection and preservation.  Similarly, I’ve found that paper prints of “lost” gramophone recordings can be digitally converted back into playable, audible form.

Some Other Early “Recordings” at IU – Listen to these on their website
Here are a few other snippets of audio obtained from high-resolution scans of books in the IU Bloomington Libraries.

audiothomasyoung

Year: 1806

Lilly Library: Q113 .Y77 (two copies, one previously owned by Ian Fleming)
Thomas Young, A Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy and the Mechanical Arts(London: Joseph Johnson, 1807), Volume 1, Plate XXV, Fig. 353.
Significance: Oldest known inscription of audio “waveforms,” not recorded automatically but drawn by hand.  (The book is dated 1807, but the engraving itself is dated 1806.)

Year: 1877

Wells Library (oversized): Q1 .S45 n.s.,v.37 1877
“The Talking Phonograph,” Scientific American 37 (December 22, 1877), 384-5, on page 384.
Significance: Print made from a plaster cast of a fragment cut from the sample tinfoil recording Thomas Edison used to demonstrate his phonograph for an audience outside his laboratory for the first time.  I’ve inserted silences to represent the missing content (which is a majority of it).  The direction of recording is anybody’s guess, so what you hear might be played backwards.


articulatevibrations

Year: 1878
ALF (Geosciences): Q1 .A5 ser.3,v.16
E. W. Blake, Jr., “A method of recording Articulate Vibrations by means of Photography,” American Journal of Science and Arts 116 (July 1878), 54-59, on page 57.
Significance: Oldest known publication of a recording of recognizable phrases in the English language (“Brown University”; “How do you do?”); also the oldest known publication of a photographic recording of airborne sounds (Image above)

john_cage_preparedpiano

John Cage Prepared Piano for
iPhone, iPad and Android
John Cage :: Official Website.

Celebrate John Cage’s 100th birthday by playing the CagePiano app on your iOS or Android mobile device. One of the many ingenious innovations of American composer/writer/artist John Cage was his creation of the “prepared piano”, in which he placed objects beneath and between the strings of a grand piano to create an entirely new instrument.

The sounds of John Cage’s Prepared Piano are now available for you to play on your portable device with this innovative app. Play meticulously sampled sounds of a piano prepared with the actual materials used by John Cage in the preparations for his Sonatas and Interludes (1946-48) as sampled under the supervision of the John Cage Trust.

  • Both paid and free versions allow you to your record your performance and share it via Facebook, Twitter and email.
  • The paid tablet version features all 36 prepared notes, playable at once, plus the ability to save your performances locally, making dramatically unique ring tones possible.
  • The free version offers 9 sampled notes on screen at a time, while a random shuffle button makes available other prepared notes.