If you can’t make it to Venice for the Biennale, you can still experience the floating radio – listen as you read this personal essay about the political highlights by Maura Reilly. Alternatively, J J Charlesworth tears apart the moral contradictions of the jet set global art world in this article Playing Politics.

Venice Radio! Safina Radio Project is an itinerant space, a boat transformed into a recording studio navigating the Venetian waterways and transporting passengers from one place to another whilst serving as a platform for exploration and exchange. The project creates transitory and transient communities with each journey, bringing focus to collective experience and targeting an investigation into how we locate ourselves and how we mediate our human and historic commonality. Safina_Radio_f0626_may6_alserkal_img The online portal includes the full program in Venice from May 6 to 8, presented alongside a range of content commissioned only for the site itself, from written interviews to audio projects, playlists and sets. Contributors of online-specific content include: British artist Scanner (Robin Rimbaud) whose work experiments with sound, space, image and form; Emirati conceptual artist and writer Hassan Sharif; Wael Hattar in conversation with artist Sadik Kwaish Alfraji; Rahel Aima and Ahmad Makia from The State; artists Lawrence Abu Hamdan and Karim Sultan; music contributions from UAE based Analog Room and Kamal Rasool (Flamingods); and MENASA music specialist Neil van der Linden. The Safina Radio Project builds on Alserkal Avenue’s expanding homegrown programme which aims to support performance, social practice and public-forms of art, by providing a unifying public forum amidst the Venice Biennale to engage with questions and concerns important to the region. The project is realised through the kind support of Abdelmonem Bin Eisa Alserkal, Founder of Alserkal Avenue. A broad spectrum of artists, writers and curators, whose practices draw from a variety of contexts, will participate in Venice through conversations and happenings on the boat, including: Raqs Media Collective, comprised of media practitioners Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula, and Shuddhabrata Sengupta from New Delhi; British artist, writer and film director John Akomfrah with writer Coline Milliard; artists Mohammed Kazem and Cristiana de Marchi; artist Rabab Ghazoul in conversation with her father; artists Haig Aivazian, Rene Gabri, Ayreen Anastas, Hrair Sarkissian and filmmakers Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi with curator Adelina Cüberyan von Fürstenberg; collaborative artists Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige; artists Wafaa Bilal and Sara Raza; and performance artist Alex Baczynski Jenkins with curators Louise O’Kelly (Block University), Ben Roberts (Modern Art Oxford), Rose Lejeune and Fatos Ustek. An audio recording of each live event will be uploaded to the website safinaradioproject.org within 24 hours of it taking place, opening up experiences and events in Venice to a wider audience.

Afterall Issue 36 Summer 2014
Afterall Issue 36 Summer 2014

Laboratoire AGIT’art and Tenq
K.P. Krishnakumar
Nilbar Güreș
Carla Zaccagnini
Andrea Büttner
Panamarenko
Enquiry on the/our outside

Afterall is pleased to present issue 36, summer 2014, which features artists and artistic collectives that question the borders of the art world or exploit other possibilities within it. Within a homogenizing art world, how do you find a ‘without’ or a productive point of difference?

Clémentine Deliss looks at the collectives Laboratoire AGIT’art and Tenq that emerged in Dakar, Senegal in the 1990s, and which undermined common assumptions about the distribution of cultural capital and knowledge between perceived centers and peripheries. Writing a subjective history of these activities, she asks how groups who wanted to be only partially known can be fully historicized.

K.P. Krishnakumar was the lead artist in the Indian Radical Painters and Sculptors Association, a collective which tried to marry art and politics and look for a way for Indian artists to be part of the global art world without having to represent their national or regional identity. Anita Dube, who was a member of the group, writes on the tragic hero that Krishnakumar became, while Shanay Jhaveri discusses the collective’s impact within Indian art history.

Often showing Turkish women in elaborate camouflage, Nilbar Güreș‘s photographs, drawings, collages and videos also reflect upon questions of cultural identity. Mihnea Mircan argues that she is one of a number of artists who are shifting the notion of identity to one that exists between the margins, blurred in transit, while Lara Fresko considers the artist’s representation of identity within a globalized framework.

Louise O’Hare discusses Andrea Büttner‘s appropriated images of mentally handicapped boys looking at HAP Grieshaber’s woodcuts to elaborate a theory of embarrassment as integral to the condition of viewing art. The social and political uses of art are also examined in Emma Hedditch‘s study of Carla Zaccagnini‘s artist’s book, which explores the Suffragette’s campaign to destroy paintings and art objects.

This notion of an internal hostility to art systems and classic standards of aesthetic criteria is picked up in Alejandra Riera‘s collective projects, for which she renounces any authorship. Her ongoing investigation Enquête sure le/notre dehors (Enquiry on the/our outside), as Peter Pál Pelbart and Muriel Combes write, explores what constitutes the borders of our society—what we relegate, for example, to the peripheries of city centres or outside of sanity.

Already occupying a comfortable position in contemporary art history, Panamarenko defied the parameters within which the art world operates when he decided to retire from artmaking in 2005. As Hans Theys and Jeremy Millar remind us, working mostly in the solitude of his studio in Antwerp, Panamarenko has queried authoritative forms of knowledge through the building of impossible machines.

Finally, in their discussion of the actual experience of living and working in the art world, Zachary Cahill and Philip von Zweck address how artists—whom they dub ‘double agents’—live between structures, seeking to put their day jobs in art institutions at the service of their artistic ‘night job.’

This summer Afterall Books will present the fifth publication in its “Exhibition Histories” series, Exhibition as Social Intervention: ‘Culture in Action’ 1993, as well as the “One Work” title  Thomas Hirschhorn: Deleuze Monument by Anna Dezeuze. On 18 October, Hirschhorn will be in conversation with Dezeuze at the Platform Theatre, Central Saint Martins, to launch the book. The next guest in our “Exhibition Histories” Talks series, co-organised with the Whitechapel Gallery, London, is curator Helmut Draxler, who will be in conversation with Helena Vilalta on 18 September.

Afterall journal is published by Central Saint Martins, London, in editorial partnership with M HKA, Antwerp, and the Smart Museum of Art and DOVA OPC, University of Chicago, in collaboration with UNIA arteypensamiento, Seville, and in association with the University of Chicago Press.

To subscribe to Afterall journal, please click here. If you are already a subscriber, you can download the e-book edition of the journal here.

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Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire

6 June–31 August 2014

In a practice that poetically blends documentary and fiction, Bertille Bak is developing a unique way of thinking about her contemporaries. As an observer of communities forming and breaking up within delimited territories, she works less like an entomologist pinning down species than with the dreamlike recreation of rituals considered as bearing witness to forms of collective living.

Whether it concerns her own community in the mining areas of Northern France or groups that are unfamiliar to her, she never chooses to distance herself or look on from afar. On the contrary, it is all about sharing a passage of life, a struggle, a resistance. For Bertille Bak, the projects are therefore set in a period of time, several months in general, during which she immerses herself in a reality and in everyday life, establishing herself there and making connections with groups who often live in precarious circumstances close to disintegration.

This is how she came to be interested in the inhabitants of an area of Bangkok under threat from a shopping development, staging the implosion of one of the apartment blocks at the end of a revolutionary swan song in Morse code light flashes. Or again in the Roma encampment of Ivry-sur-Seine in the Parisian suburbs, their forced silence and the inevitable dissimulation that awaits them.

Together with members of the communities, she elaborates a scenario in which people who are ordinarily constrained to passive resistance, and a sort of invisibility, become the actors of their own stories within their usual environments: the everyday replayed, amplified and redirected blending with the fiction imagined by the artist.

BertilleBak_TourofBabel

In Saint-Nazaire, where she has been a resident artist at Le Grand Café over the last two years, Bertille Bak has also formulated a locally anchored project that seeks to reveal sometimes hidden realities. She is interested in the shipyards, by the mechanical ballet of the machines, and she wishes to accentuate the people who work on the construction of the most sumptuous cruise ships and the crew on board these sea-going giants.

Their community is no longer bound by a common history and is first of all defined through work and the sharing of limited time and space, in which everyone has to find their place.

For this exhibition, the artist has produced a film in which the cruise liner, the recreation of a territorially delimited microcosm in the middle of international waters, is chosen as one of the background elements. With its set of spaces reserved for tourists and forbidden to employees, the cruise ship universe engenders a kind of regimented choreography, where zones reserved for some are forbidden to others.

Elegantly titled The Tour of Babel in reference to these partly invisible communities of different nationalities and individualities, this presentation will very certainly mix objects that evoke the rituals of seamen and women, as well as their voyages and their occasionally absurd comings and goings.

Bertille Bak
The Tour of Babel
6 June–31 August 2014

Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire
Place des Quatre z’horloges
44 600 Saint-Nazaire
France
Hours:
TuesdaySunday 11am–7pm

Curator: Sophie Legrandjacques, director of Le Grand Café – Contemporary Art Centre
Press contact: Alexandra Servel,  servela@mairie-saintnazaire.fr / T + 33 2 44 73 44 05
Text: Camille Paulhan

 Visual Agency

Featuring:
Omar Kholeif on Shuruq Harb
Vanessa Joan Müller on Özlem Altin
Jens Maier-Rothe on Malak Helmy
Column by Alanna Lockward

The starting point for the current issue was initially summed up with the term “visual agency.” The increase in dissemination channels and the accompanying (at least potential) publicness of visual narratives has resulted in the fact that there is hardly any more control over the contexts in which images circulate and how they are perceived, interpreted, commented on, and exploited. In the (relatively new) mass media euphemistically called “social” networks, images in any case alternate unchecked between the registers of fiction, authenticity and fetish, between evidence and manipulation, criticism and affirmation, and pass through the most varied and contrasting contexts. How do matters therefore stand with respect to the agency of images under these circumstances of the unshackling of the visual? What strategies do artists select to produce a specific context, to occupy the specific site of a visual assertion? How do they react to the routes of appropriation and reinterpretation to which the images lose their title and credits? What is still suppressed so that it cannot become visible? Such questions lead to an idea—of any type whatsoever—of a “site” of images that might be constructed and from which they can be read. Yet, just as what can be seen and what can be said are linked by the boundary that separates them, the contributions in this issue are connected to the idea of their conception in that they oppose or at least, however, shift it.

Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.
Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.

Shuruq Harb’s The Keeper—which was published in 2011 as a limited book edition—at the same time also comprises an installation and a performance and makes use of the archive of Mustafa, a street vendor in Ramallah, who prints out images from the Internet and sells them in boxes. In the past, Mustafa’s family still imported images, for instance, from China, Lebanon, or Syria. In 2010, Harb acquired some 2,000 of such unsold images and sifted through and arranged them together for The Keeper. This archive documents a changing access to images and a change in how they circulate. Many of these images were at times officially barely accessible or even banned, which is why the archive traces the history of image regimes—public as well as private—and thus represents a specific form of distribution of the sensible.

The work of Özlem Altin is linked with that of Shuruq Harb by the work on or from an archive. Central motifs in her oeuvre are the human body and the codes that it emits. In this, Vanessa Joan Müller, however, finds a subtle moment of the uncanny in and between her images, in the sense of a relationship between the animate and the inanimate that has become blurred, between the body and its eidetic double, which has solidified into a nature morte. The frozen poses, mute gestures, and motionless individuals subject them- selves to the discriminating gaze as objects and yet escape it again and again. What might seem to be a system of ordering can instead be described better through a type of stream of images and image layouts, an ongoing constructing and deconstructing of meanings, references and aesthetics.

Malak Helmy’s contribution goes back to a co-operation on an exhibition between Camera Austria and Beirut last autumn. Unexpected Encounters focused on the translation errors in political and cultural transfer. Malak Helmy participated in this exhibition with a sound work that took the mimetic abilities of the lyrebird as its starting point for addressing questions of identity and subjectivity. In his text contribution, Jens Maier-Rothe also writes about birds, migratory birds and their navigation skills. They always follow the same routes, in which their flight also seems to be a surveying of historical space. The artist pursues these traces in Egypt, a land of change, in which channels of communication decay like the coordinates of everyday life.

Camera Austria International 
published quarterly, 100 pages, German / English

Orders: www.camera-austria.at/shop

Le Mouvement – Performing the City
The 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in 2014, curated by Gianni Jetzer and Chris Sharp, continues the innovative spirit of the format by offering the most radical edition yet. True to its provocative legacy of 60 years, Le Mouvement will challenge the very definition of public art by creating no sculpture at all. The 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in Biel/Bienne will be solely dedicated to performance.

Symposium with the participation of Jean-Luc Nancy, Bojana Cvejić, Gianni Jetzer, André Lepecki, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Hans Rudolf Reust, Peter J. Schneemann, Chris Sharp, Thomas Strässle, Jan Verwoert, as well as the artists Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, and Ariana Reines

Le Mouvement is a multipart exhibition, which investigates the nature of sculpture and public space by hosting multiple performances in the town of Biel/Bienne. The show touches upon a variety of inter-related topics and issues, which include:

–The nature and uses of public space
–Art in public space
–The individual and collective body in public space—both static and in movement
–The relationship between the fleeting materiality of the body and the more permanent materiality of sculpture

Rirkrit Tiravanija, "U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller)," 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Rirkrit Tiravanija, “U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller),” 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Uniting a heterogeneous group of art historians, theorists, curators and artists to discuss these points, the symposium intends to harness the knowledge of these different disciplines in hopes of gaining a greater and more nuanced understanding of performance in public space and the current nature of public space itself.

In co-operation with the Contemporary Art History Department of the University of Bern, Bern, and Y Institute of the Bern University of the Arts (BUA), Bern

Symposium in English
French translation provided / Admission is free / Limited seating, please reserve symposium@lemouvement.ch

Press contact
Patrick Steffen, patrick.steffen@ess-spa.ch

Upcoming programming:
Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31, all three movements in parallel

Mouvement I – Sculptures on the Move
July 4–August 31

With reconfigured sculptures by Olivier Mosset, Franz Eggenschwiler, Carl Burckhardt, Max Bill and performances by Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, Ariana Reines

Mouvement II – Performing the City
August 26–31

With performances in public space by luciana achugar, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Nina Beier, Trisha Brown, Pablo Bronstein, Eglè Budvytytè, Willi Dorner, Douglas Dunn, Simone Forti, Alicia Frankovich, Maria Hassabi, San Keller, Köppl/Začek, Jirí Kovanda, Germaine Kruip, Liz Magic Laser, Myriam Lefkowitz, Jérôme Leuba, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Alexandra Pirici, Prinz Gholam, Lin Yilin

Mouvement III – The City Performed
August 30–November 2
Opening: August 30, 5pm
Kunsthaus CentrePasquArt, Biel/Bienne

Vito Acconci, Francis Alÿs, Pablo Bronstein, Stanley Brouwn, Trisha Brown, Paulo Bruscky, Martin Creed, Felipe Ehrenberg, VALIE EXPORT, Dara Friedman, Gelitin, Tomislav Gotovac, Alberto Greco, Anna Halprin, Maria Hassabi, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Sanja Iveković, Christian Jankowski, Jirí Kovanda, Liz Magic Laser, Klara Lidén, Marko Lulić, Babette Mangolte, Rachel Mason, Dave McKenzie, Dieter Meier, Ocaña, Neša Paripović, Ewa Partum, Alexandra Pirici, Miervaldis Polis, Kim Sooja, Mladen Stilinović, Beat Streuli, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ulla von Brandenburg, Ai Weiwei

For further information, please contact info@lemouvement.ch

National conference on socially engaged art
November 6–8, 2014

Call for participation
Proposal deadline: July 14, 2014

Cleveland Institute of Art
11141 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44106

unruly_cfp

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Are we talking about art that resists the conventional structures of the art world and re-imagines a new, unwieldy public sphere of social activism in the face of media spectacle and profit motives? Or can social practices in art reconcile aesthetic focus with external forces or agencies with regard for communities, perhaps affecting a timely catalyst for change? The recent spate of publications on what has been variously called community-based art, participatory art, collaborative art, relational art, social practice or socially engaged art, indicates that such questions have provoked a variety of studies that intellectually tackle what Shannon Jackson has noted as the “social turn.”

This conference, “Unruly Engagements: On the Social Turn in Contemporary Art and Design,” proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades or so. Among our primary objectives is to facilitate public discourse on the feasibility of interventionist projects in art and design in urban environments, with special attention to “rust-belt” cities like Cleveland.

We invite presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

–Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
–Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
–Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
–Urban design and design in the city as force for change
–Aesthetics, ethics and politics
–Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF-formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to:
Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira, unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Conference schedule and registration details will be posted in early autumn.

“Unruly Engagements” is a key component of Community Works: Artist as Social Agent, CIA’s yearlong commitment to exploring social agency and the visual arts.

The deadline for proposals is July 14.

About Shannon Jackson
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is Professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center. Professor Jackson was recently selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship for 2014–15. Her most recent book is Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge, 2011), and she is working on a book about The Builders Association. Her previous books are Lines of Activity: Performance, Historiography, and Hull-House Domesticity (2000) and Professing Performance: Theatre in the Academy from Philology to Performativity (2004).

About Cleveland Institute of Art
Founded in 1882, the Cleveland Institute of Art is an accredited, independent college of art and design offering 15 majors in studio art, digital art, craft disciplines, and design. CIA extends its programming to the public through gallery exhibitions; lectures; a robust continuing education program; and the Cinematheque, a year-round art and independent film program. For more information visit cia.edu.

Pratt institute presents A Community Exchange: The Socially Engaged Artist and the Public Imagination

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 1:30–5pm

Pratt institute
Higgins Hall
1 St. James Place
Brooklyn, New York 11205

www.pratt.edu/academics/art_design

Pratt_InstituteJoin us as we explore the role of the public in socially engaged art. What is the public’s imagination in relationship to social engagement and its potential within the society we inhabit? What is the nature of the public’s commitment to space and place, and how is it related to a social engagement that formulates new social imaginaries? This conversation will explore these questions and discuss the place of socially engaged art in our many publics.

Introduction: Ann Messner, Adjunct Professor of Fine Arts, Pratt Institute
Artist and activist Ann Messner has consistently challenged the unresolved schisms between notions of private life/space and public/civic experience, focusing on the relationship between the individual and the larger social body within public discourse. Ann was a key player in The Real Estate Show, breaking ground as one of the first art shows to expose the inequities of real estate in New York. More recently she critically analyzed the “war on terror” through a series of tabloid and video works created with direct-action collective A.R.T. Meteor, her 1980 public intervention in Times Square, presaged our current age of technological reliance and interconnectedness.


Facilitator Shane Aslan Selzer
(artist, organizer and writer) develops micro-communities where visual artists can expand on larger social issues and deal with generosity, exchange, and failure. In each of these projects she assembles spaces where people can learn through interaction with others by provoking discourse that is informed by circumstances that are too often held “outside” of art. She is co-editor with Ted Purves of What We Want Is Free: Critical Exchanges in Recent Art (SUNY Press, 2014).


Panelists
Jaret Vadera, an artist and cultural producer based in Brooklyn, explores the poetics of translation and the politics of vision through his interdisciplinary art practice. Jaret has concurrently worked as an organizer, programmer, curator, educator, editor, writer, and designer for socially engaged organizations that focus on using art as a catalyst for social change, including Community Arts Ontario, Rush Arts Gallery, and Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art.

May Joseph, Professor of Global Studies, Pratt Institute, teaches urbanism, global studies and visual culture. In her recently published book Fluid New York (Duke University Press, 2013), Joseph describes the many ways that New York, and New Yorkers, have begun to incorporate the city’s archipelago ecology into plans for a livable and sustainable future. Joseph suggests that New York’s future lies in the reclamation of its great water resourcesfor artistic creativity, civic engagement and ecological sustainability.

Keynote
Rick Lowe, artist, activist, and founder of Project Row Houses, a neighborhood-based nonprofit art and cultural organization in Houston’s Northern Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American communities.

PRH began in 1993 as a result of discussions among African-American artists who wanted to establish a positive, creative presence in their own community. Among Rick’s honors are Rudy Bruner Awards in Urban Excellence; AIA Keystone Award; Heinz Award in the arts and humanities; Loeb Fellow at Harvard University; Mel King Fellow at MIT; Skowhegan Governor’s Award; Skandalaris Award for Art/Architecture; and USA Artists Booth Fellow. President Barack Obama appointed Rick to the National Council on the Arts in 2013.

Support for the event provided by the Deans of the School of Art and Design and School of Liberal Arts and Sciences to encourage cross-campus collaboration and sponsored by the Departments of Fine Arts, Art and Design Education, and the Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies. Event coordinated by Heather Lewis, Associate Professor, Art and Design Education; Ann Messner, Adjunct Professor Fine Arts; and Uzma Rizvi, Assistant Professor Social Science & Cultural Studies.

The 12th Bienal de Cuenca is conceived as an open thought process, in which the artworks form a constellation of independent yet deeply interrelated concepts. Informed by Édouard Glissant’s (Martinica, 1928–Paris, 2011) understanding of knowledge as stemming from movement and relation, the Bienal addresses the suspension of the privileged condition of the artist.

In some cases, this results in nomadic artworks, not only because of their physical movement, but also through the outsourcing of creative production to the point of following an almost industrial modus operandi. In other cases, artists recuperate traditional know-how, by working with craftsmen or rescuing fables and forgotten stories, or they reinterpret already existing works and even collaborate with spirits and other-than-human beings. The dissolution of the border between the conceptual and the physical author undermines the bases of economic, geographic and political status quos, often referring, in more or less direct ways, to postcolonial debates and the need to undermine market logic. Problematizing those issues, other artists question the validity of standard and universal measurements of time and space, and point to the impossibility of reducing the world to uniform criteria.

Sara VanDerBeek, "Untitled," 2014. Digital C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures gallery
Sara VanDerBeek, “Untitled,” 2014. Digital
C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro
Pictures galleryIr para volver (Leaving to Return)

12th Bienal de Cuenca
March 28–June 27, 2014

Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca
Bolívar 13-89 y Estévez de Toral
Cuenca
Ecuador
T +593 7 2831 778

The title of the exhibition is based on the Ecuadorian expression Ir para volver (Leaving to return), which describes a physical and temporary absence (frequently even without a definite duration). While highlighting the state of movement as the key aspect of many artworks included in the exhibition, this expression also situates the 12th Bienal de Cuenca in the undefined field of speech, emphasizing the importance of dialogue and of the mixture of apparently distant, disparate, and even opposed forms of knowledge. Leaving to Return signals an ongoing dialogue that takes place far away from the rigidity of strict and polished discourses, and ultimately delves into life itself.

Dialogues, the discursive program of Leaving to Return, is structured around four of the main concepts of the exhibition. Nabil Ahmed, Sarah Demeuse, Max Jorge Hinderer and Manuel Segade were invited to organize the four table of discussion. On the final day of the program, architect Paulo Tavares will moderate a session that will explore the relation between the topics and the questions raised in the previous days, and articulate a collective dialogue.

Participants:

Residency program, September 2013–June 2014:
Agency, Helen Mirra, Eduardo Navarro, Julia Rometti and Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Sara VanDerBeek

Exhibition, March 28–June 27:
Agency, Meriç Algün Ringborg, Armando Andrade Tudela, Julieta Aranda, Martha Araújo, Adrián Balseca, Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck, Néstor Basterretxea, François Bucher, Mauricio Bueno, Saskia Calderón, Pia Camil, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Juan Downey, Patricia Esquivias, Mario García Torres, Ximena Garrido Lecca, José Hidalgo-Anastacio, Runo Lagomarsino, Little Warsaw, Maria Loboda, Claudia Martínez Garay, Benjamin Meyer-Krahmer, Ana Maria Millán, Helen Mirra, Felipe Mujica, Eduardo Navarro, Rivane Neuenschwander, Pedro Neves Marques, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Bernardo Ortiz, Adrian Paci, Rita Ponce de León, Mauro Restiffe, Manuela Ribadeneira, Julia Rometti y Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, Cecilia Szalkowicz, Sara VanDerBeek

Performances, March 28–30:
Saskia Calderón, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Marinella Senatore

Dialogues, March 29–31:
“Table 1—History, Body, and Aesthetic Condition”: Valeria Coronel, Carles Guerra, Max Jorge Hinderer Cruz
“Table 2—Appropriation”: Pierre Bal-Blanc, Christian León, Manuel Segade
“Table 3—Of Men and Measure”: Sarah Demeuse, Fernanda Laguna, Alexander Provan
“Table 4—Material Movement: Forests”: Nabil Ahmed, Mario Melo, Nancy Lee Peluso;
Discussion: Paulo Tavares

Curators: Jacopo Crivelli Visconti (curator), Manuela Moscoso (adjunct curator)

Director of the Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca: Katya Cazar

Venues: Museo de Arte Moderno; Salón del Pueblo; Proceso Arte Contemporáneo; Casa de los Arcos; Capilla del Museo de la Medicina; Colegio Benigno Malo

Media contact: Sebastián Lazo, comunicacion@bienaldecuenca.org

Mischa Kuball
Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl)

23 March–December 2014

Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl
Creiler Platz 1, Rathaus
D-45768 Marl, Germany

www.skulpturenmuseum-glaskasten-marl.de

Mischa Kuball’s public intervention Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl) both provokes and quotes Charles Baudelaire, yet at the same time, offers possibilities for identification for the inhabitants of Marl, who will be participating and are invited to bring along flowers: participation and discussion are the project’s two non-material components. The distinctive logo made up of white illuminated letters positioned high above the museum on the upper edge of the Town Hall’s façade becomes a kind of signpost, visible from afar, to the Sculpture Museum and the large vase of flowers on the left adjacent to the stairs is to be understood as an invitation to the townsfolk to bring along the aforementioned flowers for Marl and to put them in this prominently placed receptacle. It is situated immediately next to the stairs to the Register Office in the upper floor of the Town Hall—plenty of reasons then for bringing flowers! The vase and its contents will be tended by employees from the Sculpture Museum.

Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.
Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.

Mischa Kuball, conceptual artist, has developed a site-specific concept which he calls a “public preposition,” or in other words, suggestions and ideas for the public and for public space. The installation itself, planned as a temporary artwork, could also become a more permanent fixture; the artist would like to determine the actual duration of the installation in consultation with the people of Marl.

In the form of his project series “public prepositions,” Mischa Kuball repeatedly poses the question of the contemporary definition of public art within an extended context. He always begins with a precise analysis of the site where the interventions are to take place, and this approach includes an engagement with the public which has become an established feature of his artistic position.

Every place has its social and political peculiarities which the artist incorporates into his planning. His works tend to be temporary because they are geared towards the potential of an altered perception of seemingly familiar urban contexts.

Mischa Kuball has realised such concepts in different cities at home and abroad, including the work Intervento in the Caserma Cornoldi in Venice, as well as his Marfa Floater, silver / gold in Marfa, Texas, GhostTram in Katowice, Poland and his current contribution solidarity grid in Christchurch, New Zealand as part of the SCAPE Public Art Christchurch Biennial. A total of over fifteen comparable “public preposition” projects are to be published in book format, which means that the intervention in Marl will rub shoulders with works in an international context.

This project was kindly supported by the Ministry for Families, Children, Youth, Culture and Sports of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, the City of Marl and realised by Elektro Decker, Essen.

Mischa Kuball
Born in 1959 in Düsseldorf, Germany, lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany

Mischa Kuball has been working since 1984 in public and museum-based spaces. Using light in installations and photography, he explores architectural spaces and their social and political discourses. He reflects a full range of differing facets from cultural social structures all the way to architectural interventions that highlight or recode the overall emblematic character and architectural/historical context. Public and private space coalesce in his political, participatory projects. They enable a form of communication between participants, the artist himself, the artwork and urban space.

Since 2007, Mischa Kuball has been professor for media art at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne where he founded the -1/MinusEins Experimentallabor (Experimental Laboratory).

For more information: www.mischakuball.com

Press contact: skulpturenmuseum@marl.de

CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid

Per/Form
How to do things with[out] words
March 22–September 21, 2014

The project, a laboratory situation including installations, workshops, and performances, will explore questions of how art deals with reality in a performative way.

Ulla Von Brandenburg, "Die Strasse" (still), 2013. Black-and-white film, sound, 11:20 minutes.
Ulla Von Brandenburg, “Die Strasse” (still), 2013. Black-and-white film, sound, 11:20 minutes.

CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo
Av. Constitución, 23
28931 Móstoles
Madrid
Spain
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 11–21h
Intensity days: March 22, May 10, and September 20
www.ca2m.org

Curator: Chantal Pontbriand

With Mathieu Abonnenc, Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Brad Butler & Karen Mirza, Geneviève Cadieux, Jean-Pierre Cometti, Adrian Dan, Angela Detanico & Rafael Lain, Carole Douillard, Cevdet Erek, Köken Ergun, Esther Ferrer, Chiara Fumai, Ryan Gander, Simon Fujiwara, Dora García, Camille Henrot, Sandra Johnston, Amelia Jones, Latifa Laâbissi, La Ribot, Ines Lechleitner, Franck Leibovici, Cristina Lucas, Haroon Mirza, Antonio Negri, Roman Ondák, Falke Pisano, Chantal Pontbriand, Chloé Quenum, Pedro Reyes, José Antonio Sánchez, Julião Sarmento, Ulla von Brandenburg, Carey Young and Héctor Zamora

Performance and performativity are centre stage at this time. The fact that we are living more and more in an “immaterial” world, dominated by mediatisation, the impact of globalization, the increasing tendency to think of politics as biopolitics, these different factors enhance performance over materiality, or object making. Performativity explores the space in-between, what happens when bodies or objects are left to perform. To perform is to enable oneself or things to work through form. And to let form speak for itself.

Performing and performance are concepts that activate reality. In this sense, performativity (what performing and performance activate) offers resistance against a homogenization of the world. It leads to renewal, change, and expands the potentiality of things and beings.

An exhibition/event
This exhibition, conceived as an event, will enhance performativity and the way it works, the way it performs itself. It will include objects, media as well as bodies. It will be “live” at all times, as installations, photography, films, performances, discussions, inhabit the space of the museum.

The subtitle of the exhibition, given by the concept “per / form,” is driven from John Langshaw Austin, the English philosopher who was one of the founders of analytical philosophy and pragmatics. In 1955, he gave a lecture called “How to do Things with Words” in which he explores the relationships between acts and language. The book published in 1962 is often quoted when discussing performance and art. This exhibition further explores that relationship through different situations proposed by the exhibition format itself and by the works presented and activated in its midst.

The project, a laboratory situation including installations, workshops, and performances, will explore these questions of how art deals with reality in a performative way. The project consists of different modes of “display”: the exhibition per se which brings together 16 installation works, some of which include live elements, others which can be activated live in different ways, in situ works, and performative situations which will be concentrated in three days throughout the project. These are the Intensity Days, March 22, May 10 and September 21. During these days, there will be further activation of some of the installations, workshops, talks, discussions, and performances. The Intensity Lab, a space included in the exhibition, will host some of the the later, and archival material corresponding to the whole project and its developments.

Chantal Pontbriand is art critic and curator. Her work is based on the exploration of questions of globalization and artistic heterogeneity. Since 1970, she has curated numerous international contemporary art events: exhibitions, international festivals and international conferences, mainly in photography, video, performance, dance and multimedia installation. She founded PARACHUTE contemporary art magazine in 1975 and acted as publisher/editor until 2007. In 1982 she was president and director of the FIND (Festival International de Nouvelle Danse), in Montreal. She was appointed Head of Exhibition Research and Development at Tate Modern in London in 2010 and since then lives in Paris and has founded PONTBRIAND W.O.R.K.S [We_Others and myself_Research_Knowledge_

Systems].

Per/Form: the book
A book will be published including texts by Jean-Pierre Cometti, Amelia Jones, Antonio Negri, Chantal Pontbriand, and José Antonio Sanchez. The artists will contribute to the book in the form of visual essays. Editor: Chantal Pontbriand. Designer: Agnès Dahan. Publisher: CA2M / Sternberg Press.