Composition based on recording the vibrations in the structure of bridges from around the world. A sonic sculpture creating a collective space for reflection as you pass through the bell tower into the Church of our Lady.

Contemplating the bridge from the everyday to eternity.

Signal on the Silver Bridge

Torsdag 29. april, Vår Frue kirke

I klokketårnet på Vår Frue kirke blir det urpremiere på en helt ny lydinstallasjon med lyden av vibrasjoner fra Den australske lydkunstneren Jodi Rose er kjent for sitt broprosjekt Singing Bridges, der hun lager verk basert på vibrasjonene til brovaiere over hele verden. Det nye verket Signal on the Silver Bridge er basert på opptak av vibrasjonene i strukturen til tre norske gangbroer. Rose skaper et særegent sonisk rom i klokketårnet til Vår Frue kirke som antyder broer vi ikke vet hvor fører hen. broer.

Only Connect Trondheim: Come What May

Only Connect Trondheim 2021

Credits

Commissioned by Bjørnar Habbestad for Only Connect NyMusikk Festival, ‘Come What May’’ 2021 Edition in Trondheim. Jodi Rose designed a site-specific installation composed with her archive of global bridges for the Church of our Lady bell tower.

The Global Bridge Symphony is supported by APRA AMCOS Art Music Fund.

Thanks to the Ny Musikk team, NTNU, KiT, Øyvind Brandtsegg, David Rych, Alex Murray-Leslie, Jacob Jessen, Mari Bastashevski, Jordan Sand and Øystein Fjeldbo.

Jodi Rose is an artist, composer and creative director of Singing Bridges, an urban sonic sculpture playing the cables of bridges as musical instruments on a global scale, connecting bridges around the world in a Global Bridge Symphony. Rose is studying Artistic Research (MFA) in Art & Technology at Trondheim Art Academy, Norway.

After two days in the studio I worked through so many of the conceptual questions that have been bugging me for months. And opened up a stack of new ones.

Basically, I managed to hack my way around the twotone file structure and get my bridge samples into their system, playing as instruments in the data sonification tool.

Trumpets now play the Rama VIII Bridge in Bangkok, and the glockenspiel plays the Golden Gate. Problem is, all of these bridge sounds are already so complex, once you start mapping them to different notes in response to the shifts in data, it’s pure sonic chaos! If I had a system that played a sample and shifted the pitch as the data changes, that would be way more seamless. I am enjoying the ad hoc nature of this process though and the way it is forcing me to consider at a much deeper level, the relationship between the data and the sounds.

As imagined, the one to one parameter mapping of sound sample to dataset is not actually that interesting. In terms of compositional complexity – it gets repetitive very quickly. And, extremely dense sonically if I haven’t chosen the initial samples well.

Something one note, simple, not too much going on, without multiple beats or tones.

Eventually I will upload some of these composition samples, but for now am still navigating how much of this process to share and what to keep private for the eventual ‘outcome’. Although as we discussed in the Publishing as Practice workshop today, having ways to show your artistic process can be both liberating and engaging.

Liberating, because it frees you from the grip of perfectionism + as my dear friend Ernest always says: finished is better than perfect! Engaging because while it may pierce the bubble of mystery around your work, it can also make you more approachable. Since this is a project that relies heavily on collaboration, for me it makes sense to make the process as transparent as possible. This allows potential creative partners to dive into the various threads of creative process, and gives a quick overview for anyone interested in working together. It’s also a little alarming, as nothing is ‘finished’ and I don’t feel nearly ready to make it public. Yet here I am, writing for you – whoever you are, dear reader – to lay my artistic soul bare.

There was something else. Ah yes, the constraints of the twotone platform mean that I have to take a very ‘zen’ approach to the work. Like the Tibetan Monks I sawy in New York City back in 1989, drawing sand mandalas. So intricate and beautiful, painstaking work that they released into the river once it was finished. You can’t stay attached to the outcome if you keep working through the process, over and over again.

Also that there is no ONE definitive work that will come from this. Many variations will emerge. And I am starting to make peace with that as part of the creative process.

I think perhaps I had envisaged – or ensounded? – a massive, global, all the bridges playing together event. But honestly, that is only possible as a conceptual frame. If you take even the 29 sensors on the ONE bridge and try to make a piece out of them, the sonic chaos resulting is going to be almost unbearable to listen to. So I need to find ways to pin it back into a context or reason for listening, and connecting. That is, the bridges have to relate to each other in some way, and to my own practice and experience. Otherwise it becomes totally random. I am starting to find more interesting questions through this process. And dealing with technical issues that I hadn’t even considered – like the sheer volume of data generated by a bridge sensor. And the compatability or otherwise of the various types of data with each other and the systems I need to use for creating sound compositions.

As an example, I have figured out that the selected storm data from the Hardanger Bridge structural monitoring sensors is only available in mat format but the csv files I need are massive and broken down by hour, throughout the day. So I needed to find out exactly what time did this storm hit? Hurricane Nina seems like a good place to start. Around 2-8pm on a Saturday, 10th January 2015 – now I have attempted to open those csv files but their compression is not playing nice with my computer. It takes another level of engagement now to connect with the engineers and find out if they are interested in the sonification process, and how possible it is to switch formats.

I am charmed to discover that the accelerometers used are made by Canterbury Seismic Instruments, in Christchurch New Zealand, where my grandmother was born. Which makes complete sense, given the magnitute and frequency of earthquakes NZ needs to monitor. Cusp-3 Series Strong Motion Accelerographs.

Technical Specifications PDF – curious, is it possible to convert to audio signal?

I have done this with the B&K accelerometers on the Green Bridge permanent installation in Brisbane, and it only took a simple adapter…

UNDER CONSTRUCTION by Jodi Rose

That brings us up to date, and my decision now to try selecting more subtle bridge samples as a starting point, and find out how they sound using the two datasets I am already working with. Then I need to get my head around the generative composition tools and work on mapping out the structure of the piece for the Church of Our Lady.

HARDANGER BRIDGE MONITORING

NTNU STRUCTRUAL DYNAMICS
https://www.ntnu.edu/kt/research/dynamics/monitoring/hardanger

Hardanger – Monitoring – Research – Structural Dynamics – Department of Structural Engineering – NTNU The Hardanger Bridge, opened in 2013, is a 1380 m long suspension bridge crossing the Hardanger fjord in western Norway. The main span is 1310 m long, which makes it the longest suspension bridge in Norway and the 10th longest in the world.www.ntnu.edu

LONG SPAN SUSPENSION BRIDGES

https://www.ntnu.edu/kt/research/dynamics/research/long-span/suspension-bridges

NTNU STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

Professor Ole Øiseth

Phone: +47 735 91 493

E-mail: ole.oiseth@ntnu.no

Railway bridgeshttps://www.ntnu.edu/kt/research/dynamics/monitoring

Structural monitoring – Research – Structural Dynamics – Department of Structural Engineering – NTNU Extensive monitoring and measuring systems have been installed at different bridges and railways around Norway, with the main goal of generating data that can be used to develop the technology utilized for design of these structures.www.ntnu.edu
https://www.google.com/search?source=univ&tbm=isch&q=Structural+Health+Monitoring+bridge+norway&client=firefox-b-d&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjpzNn_-OnvAhXOvosKHaNoDKsQjJkEegQIFBAB

https://www.hbm.com/en/5530/structural-health-monitoring/

Structural Health Monitoring | HBMModular Solution for Efficient Structural Health Monitoring. All structures, whether bridges, wind energy plants, water, gas and oil pipelines, tunnels, oil rigs, pavements, rails, but also ships, planes, trains or others are subject to various internal and external factors which may cause wear or malfunction.This can happen, for example due to deterioration, an incorrect construction process …www.hbm.com

Modular Solution for Efficient Structural Health Monitoring

All structures, whether bridges, wind energy plants, water, gas and oil pipelines, tunnels, oil rigs, pavements, rails, but also ships, planes, trains or others are subject to various internal and external factors which may cause wear or malfunction. This can happen, for example due to deterioration, an incorrect construction process, lack of quality control or an extreme situation resulting from an accident or environmental load. To be able to observe these changes in the material and to react in a proper way before serious damage is caused, the implementation of a damage identification system is crucial. The monitoring of structural behavior can detect anomalies in time, thus enabling maintenance and repair actions to be implemented more efficiently, with a direct impact on the reduction of operating costs. Replacing schedule-driven maintenance with condition-based maintenance is the main goal of infrastructure monitoring providing the following benefits.

Your local sales office:

+47 48 300 700

HBK Norway Great Belt Suspension Bridge, Denmark

Supply of FBG accelerometers for prediction of bridge cable vibrations

Gaining Real Insight into a Structure’s Health

Civil engineering structures are withstanding an exponential increase of applied loads, impacts and environmental burdens. The assessment of the resulting structural behavior is becoming mandatory so that faults can be detected in the early stages and safety is guaranteed.

Visual inspections do not give enough information to extend the structure’s lifetime, but by monitoring the structural health, any anomalies can be detected in time. This will optimize maintenance and reduce operating costs.

Monitor your entire structure’s life-cycle – from its design, construction, and operation to its rehabilitation or end-of-service life using HBM turnkey solutions for:

  • Material testing and load assessment
  • Strain and temperature distribution 
  • Convergences and vibration estimation
  • Displacements, deflections, and rotation measurements
  • Continuous monitoring 

BRIDGE MONITORING

  • Bridge design validation
  • Bridge load assessment
  • Bridge short-term monitoring during construction
  • Bridge long-term structural health monitoring

Mezcala Cable-Stayed Bridge, MexicoSupply of FBG accelerometers for structural monitoring systemTrans-Rhumel Cable-Stayed Bridge, Algeria

Supply of complete optical measurement system for SHM

https://www.oslomet.no/en/study/tkd/structural-health-monitoring

The new continuing education course at , “Structural Health Monitoring (SHM)”, is very relevant for professionals who design large and complex bridges and buildings, or work with the detection of damage to various building structures. For example, bridges should be monitored at regular intervals to ensure the safety of the users and the environment. The bridges age and are often exposed to higher traffic, train and freight loads than they were originally designed for.

Emrah Erduran

https://www.oslomet.no/en/about/news/new-continuing-education-in-structural-health-monitoring
  • Associate Professor
  • Pilestredet 35, 0166 Oslo
  • Office number: PE825
  • Office: +47 67 23 60 01
  • Emrah.Erduran@oslomet.no
STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF BRIDGES IN SWEDEN – RoctestFUNCTION AND RESULTS Using these new techniques in the field created a lot of problems, especially during the construction period. Serious malfunctions could jeopardise the function and quality of the system and were keenly reported in order to examineroctest.com

https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/7782/structural-health-monitoring-of-bridges

Editorial: Structural Health Monitoring of Bridges

Neil A. Hoult and Branko Glisic

Editorial

Published on 20 February 2020
Front. Built Environ. doi: 10.3389/fbuil.2020.00017

System Identification of Large-Scale Bridges Using Target-Tracking Digital Image Correlation

Luna Ngeljaratan and Mohamed A. Moustafa*

  • Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, United States

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fbuil.2019.00085/full

Frontiers | System Identification of Large-Scale Bridges Using Target-Tracking Digital Image Correlation | Built EnvironmentThis paper characterizes the extensive research activities conducted in the Earthquake Engineering Laboratory of University of Nevada, Reno, in the field of dynamic monitoring and system identification of three 1/3-scale two-span bridges. The first part of the study briefly presents the verification of target-tracking Digital Image Correlation (DIC) results as compared to conventional sensors …www.frontiersin.org

Quasi-Self-Powered Piezo-Floating-Gate Sensing Technology for Continuous Monitoring of Large-Scale Bridges

Kenji Aono1, Hassene Hasni2, Owen Pochettino3, Nizar Lajnef2 and Shantanu Chakrabartty3*

  • 1Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States
  • 2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States
  • 3Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fbuil.2019.00029/full
Strategies of structural health monitoring for bridges based on cloud computingMarco Furinghetti1,2 · Alberto Pavese1 · Francesco Lunghi2 · Davide Silvestri2Received: 12 July 2019 / Accepted: 11 September 2019 / Published online: 20 September 2019 © Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13349-019-00356-5

Strategies of structural health monitoring for bridges based on cloud computinglink.springer.com

The collapse of the Polcevera bridge in Italy represents a serious event which seems to be a direct result of cumulated local damages due to the aggressive environment of the construction site. Recently, evidence of corrosion of both ordinary and post-tension steel reinforcements were detected, in addition to concrete carbonation. Such phenomena generally lead to an increase in the deformation of all the elements of the bridge structure, which start to increase in time, leading to a progressive deterioration of the overall system. As a consequence, a proper structural monitoring layout would provide an extremely useful tool, for a correct plan of maintenance for all the elements of the considered infrastructure. In this work, strategies for the definition of structural health monitoring systems for bridges are discussed, from both software and hardware points of view. More specifically, a Cloud computing interface is considered, to make recorded data available for further analyses and post-processing procedures. The presented definition of the monitoring architecture could lead to the proper maintenance of all the structural elements, preventing the unexpected collapse of the structure.


https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/infrastructure/structures/bridge/09040/09040.pdf

Structural Vibration Solutions

Structural Health Monitoring – Do you need to test the integrity of a structure over time?

The company was founded March 1, 1999 as a spin-off from Aalborg University in Denmark. Our patented software is today used e.g. by mechanical engineers for modal analysis of operating machinery and components, and by civil engineers for ambient vibration analysis of large structures like bridges and buildings.

https://svibs.com/applications/structural-health-monitoring/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIk_zj6vjp7wIVwaOyCh12bg_wEAMYASAAEgKbw_D_BwE

Phone: +45 9635 4422

Fax: +45 9635 4575

Information: svibs@svibs.com

Sales: sales@svibs.com

Support: support@svibs.comARTeMIS Modal on YouTube
How To Use ARTeMIS Modal

Structural Vibration Solutions A/S is located at NOVI Science Park, which is one of northern Europe’s most respected science parks. The location plays an important role as NOVI Science Park secures the close relations between the company and the research from Aalborg University.

  • NOVI Science Park
  • Niels Jernes vej 10
  • DK – 9220 Aalborg East
  • Denmark

https://svibs.com/about/

  • Rua Miguel Russel, 10-5º Esq.
  • Quinta do Marialva
  • 2855-120 Corroios
  • Portugal
About – Structural Vibration Solutions The company was founded March 1, 1999 as a spin-off from Aalborg University in Denmark. Our patented software is today used e.g. by mechanical engineers for modal analysis of operating machinery and components, and by civil engineers for ambient vibration analysis of large structures like bridges and buildings.svibs.com

Structural Monitoring Solutions

Structural Health Monitoring Systems (SHM)

Most companies rest on their technology laurels. Not SMS, as we partner with the best universities, engineering firms, the most progressive DOTs and other proven manufacturing leaders in the field of asset management. As a bridge owner, you get answers to your problems, not data. By using fiber optics, you need fewer power drops, less installation labor, and maintenance. This technology is ruggedized so you’re not procuring a replacement system in several years. You can trust us as we have 30 years of equipment manufacturing, SHM project management, data analysis, and expertise allow owners access to all the luxuries of SHM, at a cost-effective price.

Head Office

412 Sergeant Rd.

Lambertville, NJ 08530

info@SMSSHM.com

Tel: 609-433-8485

https://www.smsshm.com/cablesstays

Cable Stays | Structural Health MonitoringLaser Focused Cable Stays are difficult to inspect in critical areas. Acoustic monitoring provides a 100% volumetric 24/7 inspection. Many DOTs have adopted monitoring and others are actively planning an installation.www.smsshm.com

https://www.smsshm.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIk_zj6vjp7wIVwaOyCh12bg_wEAAYASAAEgJTFPD_BwE

HOME | SMS SHMStructural Health Monitoring (SHM) Most companies rest on their technology laurels. Not SMS, as we partner with the best universities, engineering firms, the most progressive DOTs and other proven manufacturing leaders in the field of asset management.www.smsshm.com

Genoa Bridge in Italy

For the Ponte Morandi bridge, Acoustic Monitoring would have given warning of the bridge collapse as the Associated Press stated that Italian engineers knew of problems with the Genoa Bridge since 1979.  

Italy bridge designer warned in 1979 of risk of corrosion

Email us for our White Paper or Webinar on Suspension Cable Monitoring.

Structural Health Monitoring for Bridge Structures

https://www.fprimec.com/structural-health-monitoring-for-bridge-structures/

Structural Health Monitoring for Bridge Structures | FPrimeC Solutions Inc.In this article, we will briefly review the fundamentals of structural health monitoring for bridge structures.Bridges and transportation infrastructure are subjected to extreme environmental loading conditions, such as snow, rain, storm, and extreme heat.www.fprimec.com

Contact Information

General: info@fprimec.com

Sales: sales@fprimec.com

Support: support@fprimec.com

Tel: +1-647-933-6633 (HQ)

We protect constructed facilities by innovative nondestructive testing solutions and advanced engineering.

300 – 2 Simcoe St. S.
Oshawa – Ontario
L1H8C1

https://www.fprimec.com/sensors-for-structural-health-monitoring/

Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring | FPrimeC Solutions Inc.With recent advancements in Sensor technology, Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems have been developed and implemented in various civil structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, power plants, and dams. Many advanced types of sensors, from wired to wireless sensors, have been developed to continuously monitor structural condition through real-time data collection.www.fprimec.com

MISTRAS Structural Monitoring

MISTRAS, STARTED OUT IN 1978 MANUFACTURING MONITORING SYSTEMS AND SENSORS…

MISTRAS offers a complete and fully integrated structural monitoring service from design to data analysis. Our structural and process engineers are able to assess customers technical needs and propose a range of monitoring options from a wide range of systems and sensors. Using the latest open source software integrated into MISTRAS systems we are able to collect, analyse, manage and present findings of monitoring accurately and concisely. This provides our customers valuable information to allow effective asset management. We work opening and honestly to provide reliable, accurate and best value. https://mistrasgroup.co.uk/bridges-structures-structural-monitoring/

Structural Monitoring of Bridges and Structures- Mistras Group MISTRAS offers a comprehensive range of monitoring, inspection and site services for bridges and structures in a wide variety of industries. We work with customers providing one-source solutions, for structures from their initial construction to management towards the latter part of service life.mistrasgroup.co.uk

UK Mistras Group

Address:Norman Way, Over, Cambridge CB24 5QE

Tel:+44 (0) 1954 231612 E-mail:info@mistrasgroup.co.uk

https://mistrasgroup.co.uk/structural-monitoring/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5Jbj__jp7wIVFGIYCh1nWwvXEAMYAyAAEgKeI_D_BwE

STRUCTURAL INSPECTION & MONITORING

MISTRAS offers a comprehensive range of monitoring, inspection and site services for bridges and structures in a wide variety of industries. We work with customers providing one-source solutions, for structures from their initial construction to management towards the latter part of service life. From basic inspection and traditional NDT, to cutting-edge advanced NDT and long-term structural health monitoring, we have a wide range of tools to utilise. Our unique mix of degree-educated and chartered civil & structural engineers, experienced bridge inspectors,  NDT experts (PCN, ASNT Level 2 and 3) and specialists monitoring division combine into comprehensive team that provide the highest standard inspection solution that you need.

We provide accurate comprehensive information and knowledge about structural condition, material properties, defects, and integrity that assists effective asset management, whole life costing and safety. MISTRAS has extensive expertise in the assessment of materials including steel, concrete, cables, composites and damage such as corrosion, cracking, scour and wire break. In addition our pool of site operatives can offer skills and capability to you, such as rope access services, slinger/banksman, confined space workers, confined space rescue teams and managers, first aiders/medics, concrete repair, small scale civils, installation of site telecoms and site network

MISTRAS has extensive experience in the application of wire break monitoring to:

  • Suspension bridges
  • Cable stay bridges
  • Post tension beams, slabs and box girders
  • Flexible risers

We provide a full design service, experienced installation teams, including IRATA, confined space, offshore certified. Once installed, we provide full remote system management, reporting, long-term support and maintenance. MISTRAS offer a completely open service and can demystify the technology and process. We can show clients our full design process, example wire breaks and our analysis procedures to provide full reassurance in the technology and service we provide.

If you can’t make it to Venice for the Biennale, you can still experience the floating radio – listen as you read this personal essay about the political highlights by Maura Reilly. Alternatively, J J Charlesworth tears apart the moral contradictions of the jet set global art world in this article Playing Politics.

Venice Radio! Safina Radio Project is an itinerant space, a boat transformed into a recording studio navigating the Venetian waterways and transporting passengers from one place to another whilst serving as a platform for exploration and exchange. The project creates transitory and transient communities with each journey, bringing focus to collective experience and targeting an investigation into how we locate ourselves and how we mediate our human and historic commonality. Safina_Radio_f0626_may6_alserkal_img The online portal includes the full program in Venice from May 6 to 8, presented alongside a range of content commissioned only for the site itself, from written interviews to audio projects, playlists and sets. Contributors of online-specific content include: British artist Scanner (Robin Rimbaud) whose work experiments with sound, space, image and form; Emirati conceptual artist and writer Hassan Sharif; Wael Hattar in conversation with artist Sadik Kwaish Alfraji; Rahel Aima and Ahmad Makia from The State; artists Lawrence Abu Hamdan and Karim Sultan; music contributions from UAE based Analog Room and Kamal Rasool (Flamingods); and MENASA music specialist Neil van der Linden. The Safina Radio Project builds on Alserkal Avenue’s expanding homegrown programme which aims to support performance, social practice and public-forms of art, by providing a unifying public forum amidst the Venice Biennale to engage with questions and concerns important to the region. The project is realised through the kind support of Abdelmonem Bin Eisa Alserkal, Founder of Alserkal Avenue. A broad spectrum of artists, writers and curators, whose practices draw from a variety of contexts, will participate in Venice through conversations and happenings on the boat, including: Raqs Media Collective, comprised of media practitioners Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula, and Shuddhabrata Sengupta from New Delhi; British artist, writer and film director John Akomfrah with writer Coline Milliard; artists Mohammed Kazem and Cristiana de Marchi; artist Rabab Ghazoul in conversation with her father; artists Haig Aivazian, Rene Gabri, Ayreen Anastas, Hrair Sarkissian and filmmakers Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi with curator Adelina Cüberyan von Fürstenberg; collaborative artists Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige; artists Wafaa Bilal and Sara Raza; and performance artist Alex Baczynski Jenkins with curators Louise O’Kelly (Block University), Ben Roberts (Modern Art Oxford), Rose Lejeune and Fatos Ustek. An audio recording of each live event will be uploaded to the website safinaradioproject.org within 24 hours of it taking place, opening up experiences and events in Venice to a wider audience.

Afterall Issue 36 Summer 2014
Afterall Issue 36 Summer 2014

Laboratoire AGIT’art and Tenq
K.P. Krishnakumar
Nilbar Güreș
Carla Zaccagnini
Andrea Büttner
Panamarenko
Enquiry on the/our outside

Afterall is pleased to present issue 36, summer 2014, which features artists and artistic collectives that question the borders of the art world or exploit other possibilities within it. Within a homogenizing art world, how do you find a ‘without’ or a productive point of difference?

Clémentine Deliss looks at the collectives Laboratoire AGIT’art and Tenq that emerged in Dakar, Senegal in the 1990s, and which undermined common assumptions about the distribution of cultural capital and knowledge between perceived centers and peripheries. Writing a subjective history of these activities, she asks how groups who wanted to be only partially known can be fully historicized.

K.P. Krishnakumar was the lead artist in the Indian Radical Painters and Sculptors Association, a collective which tried to marry art and politics and look for a way for Indian artists to be part of the global art world without having to represent their national or regional identity. Anita Dube, who was a member of the group, writes on the tragic hero that Krishnakumar became, while Shanay Jhaveri discusses the collective’s impact within Indian art history.

Often showing Turkish women in elaborate camouflage, Nilbar Güreș‘s photographs, drawings, collages and videos also reflect upon questions of cultural identity. Mihnea Mircan argues that she is one of a number of artists who are shifting the notion of identity to one that exists between the margins, blurred in transit, while Lara Fresko considers the artist’s representation of identity within a globalized framework.

Louise O’Hare discusses Andrea Büttner‘s appropriated images of mentally handicapped boys looking at HAP Grieshaber’s woodcuts to elaborate a theory of embarrassment as integral to the condition of viewing art. The social and political uses of art are also examined in Emma Hedditch‘s study of Carla Zaccagnini‘s artist’s book, which explores the Suffragette’s campaign to destroy paintings and art objects.

This notion of an internal hostility to art systems and classic standards of aesthetic criteria is picked up in Alejandra Riera‘s collective projects, for which she renounces any authorship. Her ongoing investigation Enquête sure le/notre dehors (Enquiry on the/our outside), as Peter Pál Pelbart and Muriel Combes write, explores what constitutes the borders of our society—what we relegate, for example, to the peripheries of city centres or outside of sanity.

Already occupying a comfortable position in contemporary art history, Panamarenko defied the parameters within which the art world operates when he decided to retire from artmaking in 2005. As Hans Theys and Jeremy Millar remind us, working mostly in the solitude of his studio in Antwerp, Panamarenko has queried authoritative forms of knowledge through the building of impossible machines.

Finally, in their discussion of the actual experience of living and working in the art world, Zachary Cahill and Philip von Zweck address how artists—whom they dub ‘double agents’—live between structures, seeking to put their day jobs in art institutions at the service of their artistic ‘night job.’

This summer Afterall Books will present the fifth publication in its “Exhibition Histories” series, Exhibition as Social Intervention: ‘Culture in Action’ 1993, as well as the “One Work” title  Thomas Hirschhorn: Deleuze Monument by Anna Dezeuze. On 18 October, Hirschhorn will be in conversation with Dezeuze at the Platform Theatre, Central Saint Martins, to launch the book. The next guest in our “Exhibition Histories” Talks series, co-organised with the Whitechapel Gallery, London, is curator Helmut Draxler, who will be in conversation with Helena Vilalta on 18 September.

Afterall journal is published by Central Saint Martins, London, in editorial partnership with M HKA, Antwerp, and the Smart Museum of Art and DOVA OPC, University of Chicago, in collaboration with UNIA arteypensamiento, Seville, and in association with the University of Chicago Press.

To subscribe to Afterall journal, please click here. If you are already a subscriber, you can download the e-book edition of the journal here.

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Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire

6 June–31 August 2014

In a practice that poetically blends documentary and fiction, Bertille Bak is developing a unique way of thinking about her contemporaries. As an observer of communities forming and breaking up within delimited territories, she works less like an entomologist pinning down species than with the dreamlike recreation of rituals considered as bearing witness to forms of collective living.

Whether it concerns her own community in the mining areas of Northern France or groups that are unfamiliar to her, she never chooses to distance herself or look on from afar. On the contrary, it is all about sharing a passage of life, a struggle, a resistance. For Bertille Bak, the projects are therefore set in a period of time, several months in general, during which she immerses herself in a reality and in everyday life, establishing herself there and making connections with groups who often live in precarious circumstances close to disintegration.

This is how she came to be interested in the inhabitants of an area of Bangkok under threat from a shopping development, staging the implosion of one of the apartment blocks at the end of a revolutionary swan song in Morse code light flashes. Or again in the Roma encampment of Ivry-sur-Seine in the Parisian suburbs, their forced silence and the inevitable dissimulation that awaits them.

Together with members of the communities, she elaborates a scenario in which people who are ordinarily constrained to passive resistance, and a sort of invisibility, become the actors of their own stories within their usual environments: the everyday replayed, amplified and redirected blending with the fiction imagined by the artist.

BertilleBak_TourofBabel

In Saint-Nazaire, where she has been a resident artist at Le Grand Café over the last two years, Bertille Bak has also formulated a locally anchored project that seeks to reveal sometimes hidden realities. She is interested in the shipyards, by the mechanical ballet of the machines, and she wishes to accentuate the people who work on the construction of the most sumptuous cruise ships and the crew on board these sea-going giants.

Their community is no longer bound by a common history and is first of all defined through work and the sharing of limited time and space, in which everyone has to find their place.

For this exhibition, the artist has produced a film in which the cruise liner, the recreation of a territorially delimited microcosm in the middle of international waters, is chosen as one of the background elements. With its set of spaces reserved for tourists and forbidden to employees, the cruise ship universe engenders a kind of regimented choreography, where zones reserved for some are forbidden to others.

Elegantly titled The Tour of Babel in reference to these partly invisible communities of different nationalities and individualities, this presentation will very certainly mix objects that evoke the rituals of seamen and women, as well as their voyages and their occasionally absurd comings and goings.

Bertille Bak
The Tour of Babel
6 June–31 August 2014

Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire
Place des Quatre z’horloges
44 600 Saint-Nazaire
France
Hours:
TuesdaySunday 11am–7pm

Curator: Sophie Legrandjacques, director of Le Grand Café – Contemporary Art Centre
Press contact: Alexandra Servel,  servela@mairie-saintnazaire.fr / T + 33 2 44 73 44 05
Text: Camille Paulhan

 Visual Agency

Featuring:
Omar Kholeif on Shuruq Harb
Vanessa Joan Müller on Özlem Altin
Jens Maier-Rothe on Malak Helmy
Column by Alanna Lockward

The starting point for the current issue was initially summed up with the term “visual agency.” The increase in dissemination channels and the accompanying (at least potential) publicness of visual narratives has resulted in the fact that there is hardly any more control over the contexts in which images circulate and how they are perceived, interpreted, commented on, and exploited. In the (relatively new) mass media euphemistically called “social” networks, images in any case alternate unchecked between the registers of fiction, authenticity and fetish, between evidence and manipulation, criticism and affirmation, and pass through the most varied and contrasting contexts. How do matters therefore stand with respect to the agency of images under these circumstances of the unshackling of the visual? What strategies do artists select to produce a specific context, to occupy the specific site of a visual assertion? How do they react to the routes of appropriation and reinterpretation to which the images lose their title and credits? What is still suppressed so that it cannot become visible? Such questions lead to an idea—of any type whatsoever—of a “site” of images that might be constructed and from which they can be read. Yet, just as what can be seen and what can be said are linked by the boundary that separates them, the contributions in this issue are connected to the idea of their conception in that they oppose or at least, however, shift it.

Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.
Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.

Shuruq Harb’s The Keeper—which was published in 2011 as a limited book edition—at the same time also comprises an installation and a performance and makes use of the archive of Mustafa, a street vendor in Ramallah, who prints out images from the Internet and sells them in boxes. In the past, Mustafa’s family still imported images, for instance, from China, Lebanon, or Syria. In 2010, Harb acquired some 2,000 of such unsold images and sifted through and arranged them together for The Keeper. This archive documents a changing access to images and a change in how they circulate. Many of these images were at times officially barely accessible or even banned, which is why the archive traces the history of image regimes—public as well as private—and thus represents a specific form of distribution of the sensible.

The work of Özlem Altin is linked with that of Shuruq Harb by the work on or from an archive. Central motifs in her oeuvre are the human body and the codes that it emits. In this, Vanessa Joan Müller, however, finds a subtle moment of the uncanny in and between her images, in the sense of a relationship between the animate and the inanimate that has become blurred, between the body and its eidetic double, which has solidified into a nature morte. The frozen poses, mute gestures, and motionless individuals subject them- selves to the discriminating gaze as objects and yet escape it again and again. What might seem to be a system of ordering can instead be described better through a type of stream of images and image layouts, an ongoing constructing and deconstructing of meanings, references and aesthetics.

Malak Helmy’s contribution goes back to a co-operation on an exhibition between Camera Austria and Beirut last autumn. Unexpected Encounters focused on the translation errors in political and cultural transfer. Malak Helmy participated in this exhibition with a sound work that took the mimetic abilities of the lyrebird as its starting point for addressing questions of identity and subjectivity. In his text contribution, Jens Maier-Rothe also writes about birds, migratory birds and their navigation skills. They always follow the same routes, in which their flight also seems to be a surveying of historical space. The artist pursues these traces in Egypt, a land of change, in which channels of communication decay like the coordinates of everyday life.

Camera Austria International 
published quarterly, 100 pages, German / English

Orders: www.camera-austria.at/shop

Rampa Istanbul

4 June–12 July 2014

Rampa’s first group exhibition this secret world that exists right there in public brings together the works of Etel Adnan, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin, Francis Alÿs, Otto Berchem, Attila Csörgő, Ergin Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz Çekil, Nilbar Güreş, Berat Işık, Çağdaş Kahriman, Yasemin Özcan, Funda Özgünaydın, İz Öztat & Zişan, Kiki Smith, and Ali Taptık.

Co-curated by Lara Fresko and Esra Sarıgedik Öktem, the exhibition takes its inception and title from a scene in Noah Baumbach’s 2012 film Frances Ha, in which Frances, talking to strangers in semi-drunken fervor, points out a fleeting moment when the transformative potential of love as well as the miracle of unmediated communication is rendered possible and visible. Focusing on the potentials of interpersonal relations and social movements to envision alternative worlds, the exhibition brings together works from different histories and geographies.

Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.
Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and
pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Three central works explore the many facets of travel, crossing borders, creating channels of communication, instituting solidarity, storytelling and imagining utopian and dystopian alternatives through a cartographic approach. In The Loop (1997) Francis Alÿs takes an unexpected route to go from Tijuana to San Diego without crossing the Mexico/United States border. In a similar vein, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin’s diptych piece Black Sea Map / Kéraban Lé Têtu (1999) follows Jules Verne’s stubborn tobacco merchant in a journey all the way around the Black Sea in order to get to Istanbul’s Asian coast without crossing the Bosphorus. A remnant of what became an unfinished project of the artist to forge networks of communication among the contemporary art scenes of Turkey with its northern neighbors is not only a vision of alternative routes but also a cultural project of solidarity formation. İz Öztat & Zişan’s collaboration consists of a drawing of the Island of Paradise/Possessed (1915–17) by a fin de siecle avant-garde artist Zişan, that takes the form of three letters that spell both Paradise and Possessed in Ottoman script. Within their cross generational relationship, Zişan’s departure point for the map draws İz Öztat into a journey through the absent Island of Adakale on the Danube, which materializes in a publication and a video work titled Constituting an Island (2014).

A preoccupation with space and place are treated formally in two of Etel Adnan’s abstract paintings, which evoke landscapes, Untitled (Beirut) #077 and Untitled (Beirut) #132, and verbally in Ergin Çavuşoğlu’s “Place Series” (2008). Attilla Csörgő’s sketches, Squaring the Circle (2012) are geometric studies evocative of the great architect Sinan’s fascination with placing a circle on top of a square in building a space of community as well as divine communication.

Otto Berchem’s tent-like structure invokes a traditional ritual of community with May Pole (2013), a sculpture piece on which he projects the color abstractions he blocks out from protest signs on black and white photographs of social mobilization across the world through recent history. Cengiz Çekil takes one of the most popular media of the 20th century, and strips it to its bare imagery in his newspaper collage from the series “Unwritten” (1977), opening up alternative readings through images as well as questioning the very credibility of the image itself. Yasemin Özcan’s Soap Opera Synopses, an installation dated 1997, is reconstructed in the back of the gallery space, standing in as a relic from our near history, with a sound that haunts our psyche. Özcan’s intervention into the text, which reflects the socio-political agenda of its time, gives a wonderous contextualization, and a glimpse into the machinations of repetition and change.

The exhibition explores the momentary encounters Frances imagines, in geography, history, and popular media as well as in quotidian and fantastic imaginaries of nature. Ali Taptık’s photographs depicting the urban flora arise from his practice of walking and documenting the minute details of urban landscape. His survey of a variety of frail potted plants scattered throughout the city resonates with Çağdaş Kahriman’s lament for an urban tree in Fenêtre sur cour. Berat Işık’s video duo, Butterfly Effect (2012) and Falling (2013) were produced as two separate pieces. Shown in this exhibition together, the duo explores the transformative potential of breath as the source of human voice. This potential is explored in the breath that is held and let go in Butterfly Effect and the gas filled balloons that are left to roam the skies.

Kiki Smith’s animal drawings from the series “Everywhere” (2010) explore a world which is accessible only through the perception of animals, and remain closed to human beings. Funda Özgünaydın’s human-animal collages depict the hybridization of the species, a strategy that aspires to glimpse into the perceptive range of our co-habitors. Nilbar Güreş’s Spider Woman; Mother (2006), a barely visible piece hanging uncannily from a corner harbors a quiet and unexpected strength, opening up a world not visible to those outside her web.

Bringing together works that twist, open up or change our perception, the exhibition aims to create a space where the secret world that exists right there in public appears as a possibility. The exhibition hails the social movements that will surely leave a mark on the 10s of this century by taking a fresh look at history, geography, architecture, and nature.

Rampa Istanbul

Şair Nedim Caddesi No: 21a
34357 Akaretler Beşiktaş
Istanbul, Turkey

T +90 212 327 0800
info@rampaistanbul.com

Le Mouvement – Performing the City
The 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in 2014, curated by Gianni Jetzer and Chris Sharp, continues the innovative spirit of the format by offering the most radical edition yet. True to its provocative legacy of 60 years, Le Mouvement will challenge the very definition of public art by creating no sculpture at all. The 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in Biel/Bienne will be solely dedicated to performance.

Symposium with the participation of Jean-Luc Nancy, Bojana Cvejić, Gianni Jetzer, André Lepecki, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Hans Rudolf Reust, Peter J. Schneemann, Chris Sharp, Thomas Strässle, Jan Verwoert, as well as the artists Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, and Ariana Reines

Le Mouvement is a multipart exhibition, which investigates the nature of sculpture and public space by hosting multiple performances in the town of Biel/Bienne. The show touches upon a variety of inter-related topics and issues, which include:

–The nature and uses of public space
–Art in public space
–The individual and collective body in public space—both static and in movement
–The relationship between the fleeting materiality of the body and the more permanent materiality of sculpture

Rirkrit Tiravanija, "U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller)," 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Rirkrit Tiravanija, “U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller),” 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Uniting a heterogeneous group of art historians, theorists, curators and artists to discuss these points, the symposium intends to harness the knowledge of these different disciplines in hopes of gaining a greater and more nuanced understanding of performance in public space and the current nature of public space itself.

In co-operation with the Contemporary Art History Department of the University of Bern, Bern, and Y Institute of the Bern University of the Arts (BUA), Bern

Symposium in English
French translation provided / Admission is free / Limited seating, please reserve symposium@lemouvement.ch

Press contact
Patrick Steffen, patrick.steffen@ess-spa.ch

Upcoming programming:
Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31, all three movements in parallel

Mouvement I – Sculptures on the Move
July 4–August 31

With reconfigured sculptures by Olivier Mosset, Franz Eggenschwiler, Carl Burckhardt, Max Bill and performances by Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, Ariana Reines

Mouvement II – Performing the City
August 26–31

With performances in public space by luciana achugar, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Nina Beier, Trisha Brown, Pablo Bronstein, Eglè Budvytytè, Willi Dorner, Douglas Dunn, Simone Forti, Alicia Frankovich, Maria Hassabi, San Keller, Köppl/Začek, Jirí Kovanda, Germaine Kruip, Liz Magic Laser, Myriam Lefkowitz, Jérôme Leuba, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Alexandra Pirici, Prinz Gholam, Lin Yilin

Mouvement III – The City Performed
August 30–November 2
Opening: August 30, 5pm
Kunsthaus CentrePasquArt, Biel/Bienne

Vito Acconci, Francis Alÿs, Pablo Bronstein, Stanley Brouwn, Trisha Brown, Paulo Bruscky, Martin Creed, Felipe Ehrenberg, VALIE EXPORT, Dara Friedman, Gelitin, Tomislav Gotovac, Alberto Greco, Anna Halprin, Maria Hassabi, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Sanja Iveković, Christian Jankowski, Jirí Kovanda, Liz Magic Laser, Klara Lidén, Marko Lulić, Babette Mangolte, Rachel Mason, Dave McKenzie, Dieter Meier, Ocaña, Neša Paripović, Ewa Partum, Alexandra Pirici, Miervaldis Polis, Kim Sooja, Mladen Stilinović, Beat Streuli, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ulla von Brandenburg, Ai Weiwei

For further information, please contact info@lemouvement.ch

National conference on socially engaged art
November 6–8, 2014

Call for participation
Proposal deadline: July 14, 2014

Cleveland Institute of Art
11141 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44106

unruly_cfp

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Are we talking about art that resists the conventional structures of the art world and re-imagines a new, unwieldy public sphere of social activism in the face of media spectacle and profit motives? Or can social practices in art reconcile aesthetic focus with external forces or agencies with regard for communities, perhaps affecting a timely catalyst for change? The recent spate of publications on what has been variously called community-based art, participatory art, collaborative art, relational art, social practice or socially engaged art, indicates that such questions have provoked a variety of studies that intellectually tackle what Shannon Jackson has noted as the “social turn.”

This conference, “Unruly Engagements: On the Social Turn in Contemporary Art and Design,” proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades or so. Among our primary objectives is to facilitate public discourse on the feasibility of interventionist projects in art and design in urban environments, with special attention to “rust-belt” cities like Cleveland.

We invite presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

–Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
–Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
–Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
–Urban design and design in the city as force for change
–Aesthetics, ethics and politics
–Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF-formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to:
Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira, unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Conference schedule and registration details will be posted in early autumn.

“Unruly Engagements” is a key component of Community Works: Artist as Social Agent, CIA’s yearlong commitment to exploring social agency and the visual arts.

The deadline for proposals is July 14.

About Shannon Jackson
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is Professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center. Professor Jackson was recently selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship for 2014–15. Her most recent book is Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge, 2011), and she is working on a book about The Builders Association. Her previous books are Lines of Activity: Performance, Historiography, and Hull-House Domesticity (2000) and Professing Performance: Theatre in the Academy from Philology to Performativity (2004).

About Cleveland Institute of Art
Founded in 1882, the Cleveland Institute of Art is an accredited, independent college of art and design offering 15 majors in studio art, digital art, craft disciplines, and design. CIA extends its programming to the public through gallery exhibitions; lectures; a robust continuing education program; and the Cinematheque, a year-round art and independent film program. For more information visit cia.edu.