I’m fascinated to receive an invitation from Artsy about helping to share the work of John Cage. Of course, I’d be delighted! It turns out I learned something – I had no idea that Mr Cage, in addition to being one of the most inspirational and experimental musician/composers also made works on paper and in other forms.

“Everything in the world has its own spirit, and this spirit becomes audible by setting it into vibration” said Cage. This concept was a particular inspiration for my 20 year work Singing Bridges, making music with the vibrations of bridge cables. It’s curious to see the plexigram pieces dedicated to Marcel Duchamp, who famously said “The only works of art America has given the world are her plumbing and her bridges.”

There does seem to be a curious synergy between M. Cage, M. Duchamp and the music of bridges.

I’m already a fan of Artsy for their excellent contemporary take on collecting video art and selling art work on instagram, although I have yet to reach these exalted heights in terms of becoming collectable, it’s good to see someone make a living from their work – being a posthumous success as an artist is seriously overrated.

Here’s to vibrations, spirit and new ideas!

“I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.”
-John Cage

Here is the Artsy listing, I’ll be curious to see more of these intriguing works.

“We strive to make all of the world’s art accessible to anyone online. John Cage was not only a revolutionary composer but also an innovative artist, and Artsy aspires to be a leading resource for learning about Cage’s art. Our John Cage page provides visitors with Cage’s bio, over 20 of his artworks, as well as up-to-date Cage exhibition listings. The page even includes related artist & category tags, plus suggested contemporary artists, allowing viewers to continue exploring art beyond our Cage page.”

ABOUT JOHN CAGE

One of the most influential composers of the 20th century and a leading figure in the post-war avant-garde, John Cage was a music theorist, writer, and artist, as well as a composer. His most famous piece,4’33” (1952), consisted of musicians doing nothing but listening to the sounds in a room for the duration of 4 minutes and 33 seconds. For Cartridge Music (1960), he amplified small household objects in a live performance. Influenced by Indian philosophy, Zen Buddhism, and Duchamp’s readymades, Cage championed chance procedures in music, incorporating found sounds, noise, and alternative instruments into his compositions. Two important early collaborators were the painter Robert Rauschenberg and the dancer Merce Cunningham, who was also his romantic partner for most of their lives. Cage published his first book, Silence, in 1961 and, in the 1970s, began to transform literary works, including those of Joyce and Thoreau, into music.

Rampa Istanbul

4 June–12 July 2014

Rampa’s first group exhibition this secret world that exists right there in public brings together the works of Etel Adnan, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin, Francis Alÿs, Otto Berchem, Attila Csörgő, Ergin Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz Çekil, Nilbar Güreş, Berat Işık, Çağdaş Kahriman, Yasemin Özcan, Funda Özgünaydın, İz Öztat & Zişan, Kiki Smith, and Ali Taptık.

Co-curated by Lara Fresko and Esra Sarıgedik Öktem, the exhibition takes its inception and title from a scene in Noah Baumbach’s 2012 film Frances Ha, in which Frances, talking to strangers in semi-drunken fervor, points out a fleeting moment when the transformative potential of love as well as the miracle of unmediated communication is rendered possible and visible. Focusing on the potentials of interpersonal relations and social movements to envision alternative worlds, the exhibition brings together works from different histories and geographies.

Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.
Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and
pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Three central works explore the many facets of travel, crossing borders, creating channels of communication, instituting solidarity, storytelling and imagining utopian and dystopian alternatives through a cartographic approach. In The Loop (1997) Francis Alÿs takes an unexpected route to go from Tijuana to San Diego without crossing the Mexico/United States border. In a similar vein, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin’s diptych piece Black Sea Map / Kéraban Lé Têtu (1999) follows Jules Verne’s stubborn tobacco merchant in a journey all the way around the Black Sea in order to get to Istanbul’s Asian coast without crossing the Bosphorus. A remnant of what became an unfinished project of the artist to forge networks of communication among the contemporary art scenes of Turkey with its northern neighbors is not only a vision of alternative routes but also a cultural project of solidarity formation. İz Öztat & Zişan’s collaboration consists of a drawing of the Island of Paradise/Possessed (1915–17) by a fin de siecle avant-garde artist Zişan, that takes the form of three letters that spell both Paradise and Possessed in Ottoman script. Within their cross generational relationship, Zişan’s departure point for the map draws İz Öztat into a journey through the absent Island of Adakale on the Danube, which materializes in a publication and a video work titled Constituting an Island (2014).

A preoccupation with space and place are treated formally in two of Etel Adnan’s abstract paintings, which evoke landscapes, Untitled (Beirut) #077 and Untitled (Beirut) #132, and verbally in Ergin Çavuşoğlu’s “Place Series” (2008). Attilla Csörgő’s sketches, Squaring the Circle (2012) are geometric studies evocative of the great architect Sinan’s fascination with placing a circle on top of a square in building a space of community as well as divine communication.

Otto Berchem’s tent-like structure invokes a traditional ritual of community with May Pole (2013), a sculpture piece on which he projects the color abstractions he blocks out from protest signs on black and white photographs of social mobilization across the world through recent history. Cengiz Çekil takes one of the most popular media of the 20th century, and strips it to its bare imagery in his newspaper collage from the series “Unwritten” (1977), opening up alternative readings through images as well as questioning the very credibility of the image itself. Yasemin Özcan’s Soap Opera Synopses, an installation dated 1997, is reconstructed in the back of the gallery space, standing in as a relic from our near history, with a sound that haunts our psyche. Özcan’s intervention into the text, which reflects the socio-political agenda of its time, gives a wonderous contextualization, and a glimpse into the machinations of repetition and change.

The exhibition explores the momentary encounters Frances imagines, in geography, history, and popular media as well as in quotidian and fantastic imaginaries of nature. Ali Taptık’s photographs depicting the urban flora arise from his practice of walking and documenting the minute details of urban landscape. His survey of a variety of frail potted plants scattered throughout the city resonates with Çağdaş Kahriman’s lament for an urban tree in Fenêtre sur cour. Berat Işık’s video duo, Butterfly Effect (2012) and Falling (2013) were produced as two separate pieces. Shown in this exhibition together, the duo explores the transformative potential of breath as the source of human voice. This potential is explored in the breath that is held and let go in Butterfly Effect and the gas filled balloons that are left to roam the skies.

Kiki Smith’s animal drawings from the series “Everywhere” (2010) explore a world which is accessible only through the perception of animals, and remain closed to human beings. Funda Özgünaydın’s human-animal collages depict the hybridization of the species, a strategy that aspires to glimpse into the perceptive range of our co-habitors. Nilbar Güreş’s Spider Woman; Mother (2006), a barely visible piece hanging uncannily from a corner harbors a quiet and unexpected strength, opening up a world not visible to those outside her web.

Bringing together works that twist, open up or change our perception, the exhibition aims to create a space where the secret world that exists right there in public appears as a possibility. The exhibition hails the social movements that will surely leave a mark on the 10s of this century by taking a fresh look at history, geography, architecture, and nature.

Rampa Istanbul

Şair Nedim Caddesi No: 21a
34357 Akaretler Beşiktaş
Istanbul, Turkey

T +90 212 327 0800
info@rampaistanbul.com

Faena Arts Center, Buenos Aires announces exhibitions of distinguished international artists Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich and Agustina Woodgate at the historic flour mill-turned-arts center.

Within the rich architectural and historical backdrop of the Faena Arts Center, Russian artist Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich will present a multi-layered performance piece in the Los Molinos Room, while Argentinian artist Agustina Woodgate will present a new site-specific work that will surpass the walls of the arts center and spill into the city with urban interventions. Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Fyodor’s Performance Carousel and Agustina Woodgate: GPS / Poetic Social Geometry is on view May 20 – June 8.

Faena_Arts

Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Carousel
Pavlov-Andreevich’s Carousel

consists of a spectacular circular stage divided into nine parts, which will be installed for the first time in FAC’s Los Molinos Room. As it revolves, the carousel unveils various individual performances, challenging the usual concept of space and time in the visual arts. In his use of dizzying speed, which seeks to break the boundary of purely aesthetic experience, the artist pays homage to the Soviet movement known in the West as “Down with Shame,” which organized nudist marches and evenings to sweep away bourgeois morality. His work spans various media and disciplines, delving into the relationship between the hidden and the conspicuous, while emphasizing the communication between an artist and his public, and the role of rituals in the visual arts.

Born in Moscow, Pavlov-Andreevich divides his time between his native city, London, and São Paulo. His major works include My Mouth Is A Temple (2009, part of Marina Abramovic Presents at the Manchester International Festival, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Maria Balshaw); Hygiene (2009, Deitch Projects, New York); and Egobox (2010, curated by Klaus Biesenbach and RoseLee Goldberg).

GPS / Poetic Social Geometry
Agustina Woodgate was born in Buenos Aires and has lived in the United States for over a decade. Her work explores and encourages collective human encounters, rather than individual contemplation of produced objects. Her interdisciplinary and site-specific work GPS / Poetic Social Geometry will burst out from the confines of the Cathedral Room, with performances and interventions in the public spaces surrounding the installation itself, where visitors will encounter ordinary objects worn down or altered to the point of being intriguingly unrecognizable.

Following her graduation from the National University Institute of Art (IUNA) in 2004, Woodgate moved to Miami, where she developed an artistic practice that combines disciplines like textile art and street performance. Her individual projects include Organic (2005, Liquid Blue Gallery, Miami), Letting Down (2008, Spinello Gallery, Miami), Endlessly Falling (2009, Dimensions Variable, Miami), Growing Up (2010, Miami-Dade Public Library, Miami), If These Walls Could Talk (2011, Spinello Projects, Miami), New Landscapes (2012, Art Basel Miami Beach, Miami), and Rugs (2014, Arts and Culture Center of Hollywood, Florida).

Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Carousel
May 20–26, 2014

Agustina Woodgate: GPS / Poetic Social Geometry
May 20–June 8, 2014

Opening: May 20

Faena Arts Center
Aimé Paine 1169
Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires
Argentina (1137)
Hours: Saturday–Monday noon–7pm

T +4010 9233

faena.com/artscenter

Faena Arts Center Buenos Aires
Under the guidance and overarching vision of Director/Chief Curator Ximena Caminos, the FAC is a center for arts and artistic experimentation, which presents groundbreaking site-specific installations and generates ideas and conversation with the international contemporary art world, and within its surrounding community of Buenos Aires. With 4,000 square meters of exhibition space in an emblematic turn-of-the-century building, the FAC fosters and encourages bold creativity on a monumental scale and is the heart and soul of the art district. The FAC is generously supported in its mission by HSBC and Citroën.

Inaugurated in 2011, the Faena Art Center has commissioned avant-garde artists to envision and realize major site-specific works, such as O bicho suspenso na paisagem, by Ernesto Neto (September 2011); Los Carpinteros by the Cuban collective of the same name (May 2012); Walking South by Franz Ackermann (November 2012); and The liminal space trilogy by the Russian collective AES+F (May 2013).

The New York  School of Visual Arts is pleased to present two innovative summer residencies in public art, which introduce artists to the conceptual and practical considerations of expanding a studio practice into the public realm. Both programs are open to artists interested in moving from the traditional studio, gallery and theatre space into the urban arena. Visual artists, writers, architects, designers, performance artists, urban planners and social activists are invited to apply.

Summer public art residencies

School of Visual Arts (SVA)

Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.
Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.

City as Site: Public Art as Social Intervention
June 16–27, 2014
City as Site is a nomadic summer residency that explores the diverse communities that define New York City with the aim of creating site-specific public works and brings together artists, scholars and community members to think about the role of art in constructing space for civic dialogue. Participants will develop experimental models for an artistic practice that combine methods from the arts, activism, and other fields in order to cultivate innovative approaches to the construction of social spaces as works of art.

The residency will use New York City’s five boroughs as its classroom, engaging with its communities, histories and stories as materials for final projects. Interventions may take the form of tours, temporal installations, video or sound projections, performances, community involved projects, peer-to-peer platforms, print or online publication, or a one-time street event.

A faculty composed of leading artists and social entrepreneurs will help artists originate projects that reflect current social issues and guide collaborations with local businesses and neighborhoods, as well as cultural and governmental partners.

Faculty and guest lecturers will include Ofri Cnaani (visual artist), Kendal Henry (public art, urban design consultant; visual artist; curator), Ed Woodham (artist, founder and director, Art in Odd Places), Rachel Falcone & Michael Premo (Housing is a Human Right), Tom Finkelpearl (Queens Museum), Lisa Kim (Two Trees), Micaela Martegani (More Art), Jenny Polak (artist and activist), Todd Shalom (Elastic City), Radhika Subramaniam (Parsons The New School for Design), Charlie Todd (Improv Everywhere), Risë Wilson (The Laundromat Project & Robert Rauschenberg Foundation), Caroline Woolard (Our Goods & Trade School).

Reconfiguring Site: Art, Architecture and Activism in the Public Realm
July 14–26, 2014
Making art in the public is no longer just placing an object in a public plaza, a monumental sculpture in a park or a memorial sculpture. Public art can be integrated into the landscape or digitally into the fabric of a building. It can be performative, ephemeral, digital or permanent. Many artists would like to make art in the public but feel overwhelmed by its challenges or by what is often seen as a compromise of one’s creative freedom. The restrictions imposed by a commissioning agency, as well as limitations of liability, money and recognition can also be confining for an artist.

This program is structured as a think-tank for public art. Participants will learn how to read from architectural plans and create an ephemeral work in the streets or a temporary work at a site suggested within NYC. Perfecting an existing proposal or developing one that can be realized at a later time will also be fundamental. In acknowledgement of the increasing threat of global warming, this summer’s residency will focus on the waterfront. Art and architecture serve integral functions in the redevelopment of waterfront areas, which have been affected by climate change. Residents will be encouraged to develop professional proposals, which engage a New York City-based waterfront site under the guidance of faculty members and guest lecturers.

Core faculty will include an artist, a public art curator/administrator and an urban planner/architect. Leading public art administrators will be among the guest speakers in the residency. Faculty and lecturers have included Charlotte Cohen, Craig Dykers, Eiko and Koma, Wendy Feuer, Anita Glesta, Kendal Henry, Barry Holden, Meredith Johnson, Anne Pasternak, Lauren Ross, Krzysztof Wodiczko and Nina Yankowitz.

For further information or questions regarding SVA’s summer residencies:
residency@sva.edu / T +1 212 592 2188.

The 12th Bienal de Cuenca is conceived as an open thought process, in which the artworks form a constellation of independent yet deeply interrelated concepts. Informed by Édouard Glissant’s (Martinica, 1928–Paris, 2011) understanding of knowledge as stemming from movement and relation, the Bienal addresses the suspension of the privileged condition of the artist.

In some cases, this results in nomadic artworks, not only because of their physical movement, but also through the outsourcing of creative production to the point of following an almost industrial modus operandi. In other cases, artists recuperate traditional know-how, by working with craftsmen or rescuing fables and forgotten stories, or they reinterpret already existing works and even collaborate with spirits and other-than-human beings. The dissolution of the border between the conceptual and the physical author undermines the bases of economic, geographic and political status quos, often referring, in more or less direct ways, to postcolonial debates and the need to undermine market logic. Problematizing those issues, other artists question the validity of standard and universal measurements of time and space, and point to the impossibility of reducing the world to uniform criteria.

Sara VanDerBeek, "Untitled," 2014. Digital C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures gallery
Sara VanDerBeek, “Untitled,” 2014. Digital
C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro
Pictures galleryIr para volver (Leaving to Return)

12th Bienal de Cuenca
March 28–June 27, 2014

Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca
Bolívar 13-89 y Estévez de Toral
Cuenca
Ecuador
T +593 7 2831 778

The title of the exhibition is based on the Ecuadorian expression Ir para volver (Leaving to return), which describes a physical and temporary absence (frequently even without a definite duration). While highlighting the state of movement as the key aspect of many artworks included in the exhibition, this expression also situates the 12th Bienal de Cuenca in the undefined field of speech, emphasizing the importance of dialogue and of the mixture of apparently distant, disparate, and even opposed forms of knowledge. Leaving to Return signals an ongoing dialogue that takes place far away from the rigidity of strict and polished discourses, and ultimately delves into life itself.

Dialogues, the discursive program of Leaving to Return, is structured around four of the main concepts of the exhibition. Nabil Ahmed, Sarah Demeuse, Max Jorge Hinderer and Manuel Segade were invited to organize the four table of discussion. On the final day of the program, architect Paulo Tavares will moderate a session that will explore the relation between the topics and the questions raised in the previous days, and articulate a collective dialogue.

Participants:

Residency program, September 2013–June 2014:
Agency, Helen Mirra, Eduardo Navarro, Julia Rometti and Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Sara VanDerBeek

Exhibition, March 28–June 27:
Agency, Meriç Algün Ringborg, Armando Andrade Tudela, Julieta Aranda, Martha Araújo, Adrián Balseca, Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck, Néstor Basterretxea, François Bucher, Mauricio Bueno, Saskia Calderón, Pia Camil, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Juan Downey, Patricia Esquivias, Mario García Torres, Ximena Garrido Lecca, José Hidalgo-Anastacio, Runo Lagomarsino, Little Warsaw, Maria Loboda, Claudia Martínez Garay, Benjamin Meyer-Krahmer, Ana Maria Millán, Helen Mirra, Felipe Mujica, Eduardo Navarro, Rivane Neuenschwander, Pedro Neves Marques, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Bernardo Ortiz, Adrian Paci, Rita Ponce de León, Mauro Restiffe, Manuela Ribadeneira, Julia Rometti y Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, Cecilia Szalkowicz, Sara VanDerBeek

Performances, March 28–30:
Saskia Calderón, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Marinella Senatore

Dialogues, March 29–31:
“Table 1—History, Body, and Aesthetic Condition”: Valeria Coronel, Carles Guerra, Max Jorge Hinderer Cruz
“Table 2—Appropriation”: Pierre Bal-Blanc, Christian León, Manuel Segade
“Table 3—Of Men and Measure”: Sarah Demeuse, Fernanda Laguna, Alexander Provan
“Table 4—Material Movement: Forests”: Nabil Ahmed, Mario Melo, Nancy Lee Peluso;
Discussion: Paulo Tavares

Curators: Jacopo Crivelli Visconti (curator), Manuela Moscoso (adjunct curator)

Director of the Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca: Katya Cazar

Venues: Museo de Arte Moderno; Salón del Pueblo; Proceso Arte Contemporáneo; Casa de los Arcos; Capilla del Museo de la Medicina; Colegio Benigno Malo

Media contact: Sebastián Lazo, comunicacion@bienaldecuenca.org

Mischa Kuball
Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl)

23 March–December 2014

Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl
Creiler Platz 1, Rathaus
D-45768 Marl, Germany

www.skulpturenmuseum-glaskasten-marl.de

Mischa Kuball’s public intervention Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl) both provokes and quotes Charles Baudelaire, yet at the same time, offers possibilities for identification for the inhabitants of Marl, who will be participating and are invited to bring along flowers: participation and discussion are the project’s two non-material components. The distinctive logo made up of white illuminated letters positioned high above the museum on the upper edge of the Town Hall’s façade becomes a kind of signpost, visible from afar, to the Sculpture Museum and the large vase of flowers on the left adjacent to the stairs is to be understood as an invitation to the townsfolk to bring along the aforementioned flowers for Marl and to put them in this prominently placed receptacle. It is situated immediately next to the stairs to the Register Office in the upper floor of the Town Hall—plenty of reasons then for bringing flowers! The vase and its contents will be tended by employees from the Sculpture Museum.

Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.
Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.

Mischa Kuball, conceptual artist, has developed a site-specific concept which he calls a “public preposition,” or in other words, suggestions and ideas for the public and for public space. The installation itself, planned as a temporary artwork, could also become a more permanent fixture; the artist would like to determine the actual duration of the installation in consultation with the people of Marl.

In the form of his project series “public prepositions,” Mischa Kuball repeatedly poses the question of the contemporary definition of public art within an extended context. He always begins with a precise analysis of the site where the interventions are to take place, and this approach includes an engagement with the public which has become an established feature of his artistic position.

Every place has its social and political peculiarities which the artist incorporates into his planning. His works tend to be temporary because they are geared towards the potential of an altered perception of seemingly familiar urban contexts.

Mischa Kuball has realised such concepts in different cities at home and abroad, including the work Intervento in the Caserma Cornoldi in Venice, as well as his Marfa Floater, silver / gold in Marfa, Texas, GhostTram in Katowice, Poland and his current contribution solidarity grid in Christchurch, New Zealand as part of the SCAPE Public Art Christchurch Biennial. A total of over fifteen comparable “public preposition” projects are to be published in book format, which means that the intervention in Marl will rub shoulders with works in an international context.

This project was kindly supported by the Ministry for Families, Children, Youth, Culture and Sports of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, the City of Marl and realised by Elektro Decker, Essen.

Mischa Kuball
Born in 1959 in Düsseldorf, Germany, lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany

Mischa Kuball has been working since 1984 in public and museum-based spaces. Using light in installations and photography, he explores architectural spaces and their social and political discourses. He reflects a full range of differing facets from cultural social structures all the way to architectural interventions that highlight or recode the overall emblematic character and architectural/historical context. Public and private space coalesce in his political, participatory projects. They enable a form of communication between participants, the artist himself, the artwork and urban space.

Since 2007, Mischa Kuball has been professor for media art at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne where he founded the -1/MinusEins Experimentallabor (Experimental Laboratory).

For more information: www.mischakuball.com

Press contact: skulpturenmuseum@marl.de

CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Madrid

Per/Form
How to do things with[out] words
March 22–September 21, 2014

The project, a laboratory situation including installations, workshops, and performances, will explore questions of how art deals with reality in a performative way.

Ulla Von Brandenburg, "Die Strasse" (still), 2013. Black-and-white film, sound, 11:20 minutes.
Ulla Von Brandenburg, “Die Strasse” (still), 2013. Black-and-white film, sound, 11:20 minutes.

CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo
Av. Constitución, 23
28931 Móstoles
Madrid
Spain
Hours: Tuesday–Sunday 11–21h
Intensity days: March 22, May 10, and September 20
www.ca2m.org

Curator: Chantal Pontbriand

With Mathieu Abonnenc, Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Brad Butler & Karen Mirza, Geneviève Cadieux, Jean-Pierre Cometti, Adrian Dan, Angela Detanico & Rafael Lain, Carole Douillard, Cevdet Erek, Köken Ergun, Esther Ferrer, Chiara Fumai, Ryan Gander, Simon Fujiwara, Dora García, Camille Henrot, Sandra Johnston, Amelia Jones, Latifa Laâbissi, La Ribot, Ines Lechleitner, Franck Leibovici, Cristina Lucas, Haroon Mirza, Antonio Negri, Roman Ondák, Falke Pisano, Chantal Pontbriand, Chloé Quenum, Pedro Reyes, José Antonio Sánchez, Julião Sarmento, Ulla von Brandenburg, Carey Young and Héctor Zamora

Performance and performativity are centre stage at this time. The fact that we are living more and more in an “immaterial” world, dominated by mediatisation, the impact of globalization, the increasing tendency to think of politics as biopolitics, these different factors enhance performance over materiality, or object making. Performativity explores the space in-between, what happens when bodies or objects are left to perform. To perform is to enable oneself or things to work through form. And to let form speak for itself.

Performing and performance are concepts that activate reality. In this sense, performativity (what performing and performance activate) offers resistance against a homogenization of the world. It leads to renewal, change, and expands the potentiality of things and beings.

An exhibition/event
This exhibition, conceived as an event, will enhance performativity and the way it works, the way it performs itself. It will include objects, media as well as bodies. It will be “live” at all times, as installations, photography, films, performances, discussions, inhabit the space of the museum.

The subtitle of the exhibition, given by the concept “per / form,” is driven from John Langshaw Austin, the English philosopher who was one of the founders of analytical philosophy and pragmatics. In 1955, he gave a lecture called “How to do Things with Words” in which he explores the relationships between acts and language. The book published in 1962 is often quoted when discussing performance and art. This exhibition further explores that relationship through different situations proposed by the exhibition format itself and by the works presented and activated in its midst.

The project, a laboratory situation including installations, workshops, and performances, will explore these questions of how art deals with reality in a performative way. The project consists of different modes of “display”: the exhibition per se which brings together 16 installation works, some of which include live elements, others which can be activated live in different ways, in situ works, and performative situations which will be concentrated in three days throughout the project. These are the Intensity Days, March 22, May 10 and September 21. During these days, there will be further activation of some of the installations, workshops, talks, discussions, and performances. The Intensity Lab, a space included in the exhibition, will host some of the the later, and archival material corresponding to the whole project and its developments.

Chantal Pontbriand is art critic and curator. Her work is based on the exploration of questions of globalization and artistic heterogeneity. Since 1970, she has curated numerous international contemporary art events: exhibitions, international festivals and international conferences, mainly in photography, video, performance, dance and multimedia installation. She founded PARACHUTE contemporary art magazine in 1975 and acted as publisher/editor until 2007. In 1982 she was president and director of the FIND (Festival International de Nouvelle Danse), in Montreal. She was appointed Head of Exhibition Research and Development at Tate Modern in London in 2010 and since then lives in Paris and has founded PONTBRIAND W.O.R.K.S [We_Others and myself_Research_Knowledge_

Systems].

Per/Form: the book
A book will be published including texts by Jean-Pierre Cometti, Amelia Jones, Antonio Negri, Chantal Pontbriand, and José Antonio Sanchez. The artists will contribute to the book in the form of visual essays. Editor: Chantal Pontbriand. Designer: Agnès Dahan. Publisher: CA2M / Sternberg Press.

Chocolate Vinyl: Music you can eat!

Julia Drouhin at Sonic Protest festival La Générale, Paris. April 12th, 2013

Playing two of my favourite things together: chocolate and music at the wonderful venue in an old power station La Générale Nord-Est, Coopérative artistique, politique et sociale. “An invocation in chocolate of dead singers, whose voices are inspired by a recording of Clair de Lune 1860.”

14, av. Parmentier Paris XIe – M° Voltaire.

Julia et ses disques en chocolat, Paris la Générale, Sonic Protest 14apr2013 from NO MORE RETURN on Vimeo.

DISCO GHOST, Julia Drouhin (création 2013 pour MoMa / MOFO / MONA, Hobart, Tasmanie). Une invocation chocolatière de chanteurs morts, dont les voix sont inspirées d’un enregistrement phonautographique d’Au Clair de la lune de 1860. Écoute la galette, partage l’ex-voto et digère la musique.

Disco Ghost - Julia Drouhin at Sonic Protest, la Générale, Paris 2013
Disco Ghost – Julia Drouhin at Sonic Protest, la Générale, Paris 2013

Sonic Protest Festival

Sonic Protest, 9ème édition, du 11 au 21 avril 2013 !

Cette année, le festival propose sur 10 jours plus de 50 concerts, dans 11 villes en France, Suisse et Belgique, des expositions et 4 évènements en entrée libre. Un panorama subjectif et non exhaustif des musiques expérimentales et des pratiques plastiques qui y sont associées.

Premiers concerts en France pour : THE DEAD C, TORTURING NURSE, URSULA BOGNER, PALAIS SCHAUMBURG, MECANATION (Pierre BASTIEN & ONE MAN NATION), Marc HURTADO with VOMIR et GRAVETEMPLE !

Au programme aussi : une performance inédite de The RED KRAYOLA en exclusivité européenne, plusieurs projets avec Thierry MADIOT, une collaboration CHEVEU & Xavier KLAINE (Winter Family), et une quinzaine d’autres concerts hors-normes parmi lesquels CUT HANDS, LES REINES PROCHAINES, Frédéric LE JUNTER, COMPUTER PIPA (Kink Gong et Li Daiguo), René ZOSSO & Anne OSNOWYCZ, Flo KAUFMANN ou MICRO_PENIS.

En première partie du festival, Sonic Protest propose une série d’expositions et d’installations, en accès libre, avec : les dessins de Nick BLINKO de Rudimentary Peni (dans le cadre de “HEY! modern art & pop culture exhibition Part II”) du 11 avril au 18 mai et du 12 au 15 avril le festival investit la Générale du Nord-Est avec 3 installations sonores et/ou vidéo : CORPUS (Art of Failure), YOU ARE THE LISTENER (Thierry Madiot) et CCRASH TV (Jérôme Fino & Yann Leguay).

Billetterie en ligne https://fr.yesgolive.com/sonic-protest
Pass jour (de 10 à 15 euros) et Pass festival (60 euros : 6 soirées du 16 au 21 avril + compilation double CD).

PARIS

VENDREDI 12 AVRIL
LA GÉNÉRALE DU NORD-EST
14, Av. Parmentier, 75011 Paris
Ouverture des portes : 18h30
Entrée libre

Vernissages
CORPUS
Art of Failure

FRANCE

YOU ARE THE LISTENER
Thierry Madiot

Jusqu’au 15 avril
FRANCE

CCRASH TV
Jérôme Fino, Yann Leguay

FRANCE

Concerts
Andy Guhl
SUISSE

Nicolas Maigret
FRANCE

SAMEDI 13
DIMANCHE 14 AVRIL
LA GAîTÉ LYRIQUE
3bis, Rue Papin, 75003 Paris
Ouverture des portes : 14H30
Entrée libre

PHONOSCOPIE
Thierry Madiot, Yanik Miossec

FRANCE
Réservation conseillée !

LUNDI 15 AVRIL
LA GÉNÉRALE DU NORD-EST
14, Av. Parmentier, 75011 Paris
Ouverture des portes : 18h30
Entrée libre

Séance d’écoute, conférence
et projections :
KINK GONG
FRANCE

Concert
Li Dai Guo
CHINE