Le Mouvement – Performing the City
The 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in 2014, curated by Gianni Jetzer and Chris Sharp, continues the innovative spirit of the format by offering the most radical edition yet. True to its provocative legacy of 60 years, Le Mouvement will challenge the very definition of public art by creating no sculpture at all. The 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in Biel/Bienne will be solely dedicated to performance.

Symposium with the participation of Jean-Luc Nancy, Bojana Cvejić, Gianni Jetzer, André Lepecki, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Hans Rudolf Reust, Peter J. Schneemann, Chris Sharp, Thomas Strässle, Jan Verwoert, as well as the artists Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, and Ariana Reines

Le Mouvement is a multipart exhibition, which investigates the nature of sculpture and public space by hosting multiple performances in the town of Biel/Bienne. The show touches upon a variety of inter-related topics and issues, which include:

–The nature and uses of public space
–Art in public space
–The individual and collective body in public space—both static and in movement
–The relationship between the fleeting materiality of the body and the more permanent materiality of sculpture

Rirkrit Tiravanija, "U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller)," 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Rirkrit Tiravanija, “U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller),” 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Uniting a heterogeneous group of art historians, theorists, curators and artists to discuss these points, the symposium intends to harness the knowledge of these different disciplines in hopes of gaining a greater and more nuanced understanding of performance in public space and the current nature of public space itself.

In co-operation with the Contemporary Art History Department of the University of Bern, Bern, and Y Institute of the Bern University of the Arts (BUA), Bern

Symposium in English
French translation provided / Admission is free / Limited seating, please reserve symposium@lemouvement.ch

Press contact
Patrick Steffen, patrick.steffen@ess-spa.ch

Upcoming programming:
Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31, all three movements in parallel

Mouvement I – Sculptures on the Move
July 4–August 31

With reconfigured sculptures by Olivier Mosset, Franz Eggenschwiler, Carl Burckhardt, Max Bill and performances by Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, Ariana Reines

Mouvement II – Performing the City
August 26–31

With performances in public space by luciana achugar, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Nina Beier, Trisha Brown, Pablo Bronstein, Eglè Budvytytè, Willi Dorner, Douglas Dunn, Simone Forti, Alicia Frankovich, Maria Hassabi, San Keller, Köppl/Začek, Jirí Kovanda, Germaine Kruip, Liz Magic Laser, Myriam Lefkowitz, Jérôme Leuba, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Alexandra Pirici, Prinz Gholam, Lin Yilin

Mouvement III – The City Performed
August 30–November 2
Opening: August 30, 5pm
Kunsthaus CentrePasquArt, Biel/Bienne

Vito Acconci, Francis Alÿs, Pablo Bronstein, Stanley Brouwn, Trisha Brown, Paulo Bruscky, Martin Creed, Felipe Ehrenberg, VALIE EXPORT, Dara Friedman, Gelitin, Tomislav Gotovac, Alberto Greco, Anna Halprin, Maria Hassabi, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Sanja Iveković, Christian Jankowski, Jirí Kovanda, Liz Magic Laser, Klara Lidén, Marko Lulić, Babette Mangolte, Rachel Mason, Dave McKenzie, Dieter Meier, Ocaña, Neša Paripović, Ewa Partum, Alexandra Pirici, Miervaldis Polis, Kim Sooja, Mladen Stilinović, Beat Streuli, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ulla von Brandenburg, Ai Weiwei

For further information, please contact info@lemouvement.ch

National conference on socially engaged art
November 6–8, 2014

Call for participation
Proposal deadline: July 14, 2014

Cleveland Institute of Art
11141 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44106

unruly_cfp

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Are we talking about art that resists the conventional structures of the art world and re-imagines a new, unwieldy public sphere of social activism in the face of media spectacle and profit motives? Or can social practices in art reconcile aesthetic focus with external forces or agencies with regard for communities, perhaps affecting a timely catalyst for change? The recent spate of publications on what has been variously called community-based art, participatory art, collaborative art, relational art, social practice or socially engaged art, indicates that such questions have provoked a variety of studies that intellectually tackle what Shannon Jackson has noted as the “social turn.”

This conference, “Unruly Engagements: On the Social Turn in Contemporary Art and Design,” proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades or so. Among our primary objectives is to facilitate public discourse on the feasibility of interventionist projects in art and design in urban environments, with special attention to “rust-belt” cities like Cleveland.

We invite presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

–Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
–Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
–Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
–Urban design and design in the city as force for change
–Aesthetics, ethics and politics
–Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF-formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to:
Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira, unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Conference schedule and registration details will be posted in early autumn.

“Unruly Engagements” is a key component of Community Works: Artist as Social Agent, CIA’s yearlong commitment to exploring social agency and the visual arts.

The deadline for proposals is July 14.

About Shannon Jackson
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is Professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center. Professor Jackson was recently selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship for 2014–15. Her most recent book is Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge, 2011), and she is working on a book about The Builders Association. Her previous books are Lines of Activity: Performance, Historiography, and Hull-House Domesticity (2000) and Professing Performance: Theatre in the Academy from Philology to Performativity (2004).

About Cleveland Institute of Art
Founded in 1882, the Cleveland Institute of Art is an accredited, independent college of art and design offering 15 majors in studio art, digital art, craft disciplines, and design. CIA extends its programming to the public through gallery exhibitions; lectures; a robust continuing education program; and the Cinematheque, a year-round art and independent film program. For more information visit cia.edu.

The New York  School of Visual Arts is pleased to present two innovative summer residencies in public art, which introduce artists to the conceptual and practical considerations of expanding a studio practice into the public realm. Both programs are open to artists interested in moving from the traditional studio, gallery and theatre space into the urban arena. Visual artists, writers, architects, designers, performance artists, urban planners and social activists are invited to apply.

Summer public art residencies

School of Visual Arts (SVA)

Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.
Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.

City as Site: Public Art as Social Intervention
June 16–27, 2014
City as Site is a nomadic summer residency that explores the diverse communities that define New York City with the aim of creating site-specific public works and brings together artists, scholars and community members to think about the role of art in constructing space for civic dialogue. Participants will develop experimental models for an artistic practice that combine methods from the arts, activism, and other fields in order to cultivate innovative approaches to the construction of social spaces as works of art.

The residency will use New York City’s five boroughs as its classroom, engaging with its communities, histories and stories as materials for final projects. Interventions may take the form of tours, temporal installations, video or sound projections, performances, community involved projects, peer-to-peer platforms, print or online publication, or a one-time street event.

A faculty composed of leading artists and social entrepreneurs will help artists originate projects that reflect current social issues and guide collaborations with local businesses and neighborhoods, as well as cultural and governmental partners.

Faculty and guest lecturers will include Ofri Cnaani (visual artist), Kendal Henry (public art, urban design consultant; visual artist; curator), Ed Woodham (artist, founder and director, Art in Odd Places), Rachel Falcone & Michael Premo (Housing is a Human Right), Tom Finkelpearl (Queens Museum), Lisa Kim (Two Trees), Micaela Martegani (More Art), Jenny Polak (artist and activist), Todd Shalom (Elastic City), Radhika Subramaniam (Parsons The New School for Design), Charlie Todd (Improv Everywhere), Risë Wilson (The Laundromat Project & Robert Rauschenberg Foundation), Caroline Woolard (Our Goods & Trade School).

Reconfiguring Site: Art, Architecture and Activism in the Public Realm
July 14–26, 2014
Making art in the public is no longer just placing an object in a public plaza, a monumental sculpture in a park or a memorial sculpture. Public art can be integrated into the landscape or digitally into the fabric of a building. It can be performative, ephemeral, digital or permanent. Many artists would like to make art in the public but feel overwhelmed by its challenges or by what is often seen as a compromise of one’s creative freedom. The restrictions imposed by a commissioning agency, as well as limitations of liability, money and recognition can also be confining for an artist.

This program is structured as a think-tank for public art. Participants will learn how to read from architectural plans and create an ephemeral work in the streets or a temporary work at a site suggested within NYC. Perfecting an existing proposal or developing one that can be realized at a later time will also be fundamental. In acknowledgement of the increasing threat of global warming, this summer’s residency will focus on the waterfront. Art and architecture serve integral functions in the redevelopment of waterfront areas, which have been affected by climate change. Residents will be encouraged to develop professional proposals, which engage a New York City-based waterfront site under the guidance of faculty members and guest lecturers.

Core faculty will include an artist, a public art curator/administrator and an urban planner/architect. Leading public art administrators will be among the guest speakers in the residency. Faculty and lecturers have included Charlotte Cohen, Craig Dykers, Eiko and Koma, Wendy Feuer, Anita Glesta, Kendal Henry, Barry Holden, Meredith Johnson, Anne Pasternak, Lauren Ross, Krzysztof Wodiczko and Nina Yankowitz.

For further information or questions regarding SVA’s summer residencies:
residency@sva.edu / T +1 212 592 2188.

MuseRuole – women in experimental music

ON THE AIR: CALL FOR SOUND PIECES

Deadline 17th May 2013

MuseRuole is a festival dedicated to experimental music and puts contemporary female musicians and performers at its centre. It is a journey of discovery into the wide world of current musical research, looking for specifically female modes of expression, with its own grammar and personal style. This year (2013) we focus on the theme of radio as a space for musical research and a medium of technological innovation, including  notions of sending and receiving in equal measure.

museruolecfp
Even today radio is an important method of communication: it remains one of the most powerful, cheapest, accessible and world spanning of media. Despite its long history and being one of the first mass media of the last century, radio has always been able to renew itself, adapting to changing realities and remaining in step with the future. And so radio is an instrument of disseminating knowledge as well as a research space for new technologies and formats: as a global platform it offers the possibility to develop innovative networks and ways to connect.

MuseRuole – Radio Edition invites female artists, composers and musicians to participate in the ‘virtual jukebox on the air”. To submit, please send us a short composition, fieldrecording or excerpt of a longer work (maximum length: 5 minutes). The selected works will become part of this year’s edition of MuseRuole and will be introduced at Museion – Passage (Museum of modern and contemporary art, Bozen – IT) on 5th June 2013. They will also me made available for download via soundcloud. In addition, they will be played via Radia, an international network of 24 independent stations, on national and local radio stations. Last but not least from 7th-30t June 2013 they will be part of a listening station at the Women’s Museum in Meran, Italy.

Submission requirements:

– no application fees
– submission of stereo audio files in .wav or .aif format only
– the maximum length is 5 minutes
– please send the file using ‘WeTransfer’ or other file-sharing at the email address: MuseRuole@yahoo.it
– as part of the project your file will be available for downloadable from Soundcloud (Creative Commons license)
Please include in your submission:

– a short description of the piece (max 100 words), duration and year of creation
– a short biography (max 100 words)
– if possible, a web-link

Deadline: May the 17th 2013

Artistic director: Valeria Merlini

The project is organized together with Assessorato alla Cultura e alla Convivenza, Comune Bolzano.

In collaboration with Museia, Transart, Reboot fm, Radia.

Case Pyhäjoki – Artistic reflections on nuclear influence
Transdisciplinary expedition, production workshop and events

Location: Pyhäjoki, Finland
Time: 31.7. – 12.8.2013
For: artists, activists, scientists, thinkers and doers + everything and opinion in-between.

Deadline to apply: 5.5.2013 (e-mail letter of motivation to mkk[-at-]katastro.fi)

Initiated by artist Mari Keski-Korsu, now a collaboration between artist-organiser and researcher Andrew Paterson/Pixelache, musician and artist Antye Greie-Ripatti/Hai Art, Finnish Bioart Society and Pro Hanhikivi.

‘Case Pyhäjoki – Artistic reflections on nuclear influence’ is a transdisciplinary artistic expedition, production workshop and presentation events in Pyhäjoki, North Ostrobothnia, Finland 31st of July to 12th of August 2013. The sixth nuclear power plant of Finland is planned to be built at Hanhikivi Cape in Pyhäjoki.

The aim of the project is to explore artistic perspectives on the vast changes planned in Pyhäjoki, through the planning of a nuclear power plant at the site, and this way of considering energy production and consuming in the world. Artists can not only reflect upon and depict social phenomena and socio-economical relations, but can also situate themselves in between politics, activism and science. Can art make changes? If so, what would be the creative tools of activism? Life itself has become increasingly politicised in the new millennium and obviously this reflects on us all. There are plenty of art works that comment on issues seen unethical or wrong, revealing different kinds of world views. Also, there are community art projects that comment for example social condition that involve participants from different fields. But can the border in between art and activism be blurred more? Could it be involving yet aesthetical? Aren’t we all activists? What are other ways of activism in addition what we are used to think? And what is the change we are after? The nuclear power plant in Pyhäjoki is a concrete project that connects many aspects from NGO-activity, politics, local and global economical situation to energy production and consumption expectations as well as decreasing natural resources.

No to 6. nuclear power plant, sign at Parhalahti village in Pyhäjoki, 2012.

The local situation in Pyhäjoki, and the planned nuclear power plant, is a case example for the workshop. People have formed strong opinions about the plant. The small community in the area has divided into those who are for and those who are against the power plant project. The aim of the expedition is to familiarise well with the current conditions in Pyhäjoki and try to collaborate with the local community, although many questions may be raised with are not easy. Could art work in between the two polarised opinions about the power plant? What kind of political process leads to the power plant plan? What does it mean to a small, agricultural community like Pyhäjoki or Ostrobothnia area? What does it mean at the national and global level? Can nuclear power mitigate climate change? Does nuclear power make Finland energy independent? What are the alternatives to nuclear power i.e. zero growth or new means of renewable energy production etc? Pyhäjoki is an excellent case study during the times of continuing ecological, social and economical crisis of the different path choices which humankind can take in order to flourish.

The first days of the expedition are for discussions, presentations (both local, national and international researchers, activists and artists), getting to know the area and its’ people with trips and excursions. The rest of the days are dedicated for independent or group work that can lead to e.g. a project demo, plan, performance, artistic action tools, discussion event, intervention etc. locally or creating overall action structures that can be implemented elsewhere. There will be a final public presentation and if needed a small exhibition for demos, ideas and documentations in the end of this production workshop. The aim is to have something concrete in our hands in the end to continue the work in the future.

The presentations by different experts during the workshop are open to public.

PRACTICAL DETAILS

Please send your letter of motivation to Mari Keski-Korsu mkk[-at-]katastro.fi by 5th of May 2013.

Case Pyhäjoki -project covers the participants travel, accommodation and per diems. There is also a possibility for documentation fee in the end. We will accommodate in a cozy Holiday Village Kielosaari / www.kielosaari.fi and utilise some other spaces in Pyhäjoki.

The travel dates are 31st of July and 12th of August.

The selected participants will be contacted in the beginning of May 2013.

ORGANISERS AND SUPPORT

Case Pyhäjoki was initiated by artist Mari Keski-Korsu and is now a collaboration in between artist-organiser and researcher Andrew Paterson/Pixelache, musician and artist Antye Greie-Ripatti/Hai Art, Finnish Bioart Society and Pro Hanhikivi. Please read more about the organisers in the end of this e-mail.

Case Pyhäjoki is funded by Kone Foundation / www.koneensaatio.fi and Arts Promotion Centre of Finland / www.taike.fi.

BACKGROUND INFO

The actual building location of the nuclear power plant is Hanhikivi Cape. 65% of the area is nature preservation with rich marine flora and fauna. It is also a rare land lifting shore where the land is still rising up from the sea due to processes of the last Ice age. There is no industry or energy production at the cape. The infrastructure for the nuclear power plant will be build as new in a so called greenfield location. Even thought the building of the plant will last for years, we are living the last moments to experience Hanhikivi as it is now. More information at http://www.hanhikivi.net

The nuclear power plant is hoped to bring prosperity to the local community but there are still many people against the building plan. People are scared to loose their land, homes and all the risks the nuclear power production brings. Recently, the company responsible of the project Fennovoima Oy announced the plan to store the nuclear waste materials also at the Pyhäjoki plant, as the Finnish long-term nuclear waste material storage ‘Olkiluoto/Onkalo’ may not be able to store all the country’s nuclear waste. In autumn 2012, the German energy company E-on resigned from the Pyhäjoki Nuclear Power Plant project. It was the biggest investor in the project and was considered to have the best know-how of the building process. Other international nuclear energy partners have been approached to replace E-on.

The biggest town close to Pyhäjoki is Raahe and the neighbouring municipalities including Pyhäjoki have been very much dependent on one big employer, steel factory Rautaruukki Oy, established in Raahe in 1960. It was seen as an answer to economical despair after the local shipping companies declined, and now that Rautaruukki has been laying off people. Hence, the nuclear power plant is seen to bring new jobs and basically repeat the economic promise that Rautaruukki brought to the area previously. Another point of view is also that the plant can produce energy for the needs of the steel factory.
www.raahe.fi
www.pyhajoki.fi

MORE INFO ABOUT THE ORGANISERS AND PARTNERS

Mari Keski-Korsu (Artist, initiator of the project, organiser, born in Raahe)
Mari Keski-Korsu (mkk) is an transdisciplinary artist. She explores how ecological and socio-economical changes manifest in people’s everyday life. Her works have a political nature with a humorous twist. The basis of the work is in location, a place and people’s relations to it. Keski-Korsu started her artistic career with photography and then started to work with internet live streaming in the mid 1990′. This lead her to work with live video visualisations as well as net and video art, interventions, documentary, installations and location based art. She is interested in relations in between art, politics and science. The works has been exhibited in Europe and in several other countries around the world. She collaborates with artist groups, scientists as well as organises and curates different types of projects.
www.artsufartsu.net

Pixelache (Contact person and participating artist Andrew Paterson)
Pixelache, based in Helsinki, is a transdisciplinary platform for experimental art, design, research and activism. Amongst our fields of interest are: experimental interaction and electronics; renewable energy production/use; bioarts and art-science culture; grassroot organising and networks; politics and economics of media/technology; alternative economy cultures; VJ culture and audiovisual performances; media literacy and engaging environmental issues. Pixelversity, its outreach and education programme since 2010, aims to be a ‘learning bridge’ between practitioners, cultural and non-profit organisations, interested individuals and larger institutions, and an outreach programme extending beyond Helsinki. Consideration is given to the relationships between the different activities, and how they may build up accumulative knowledge and skills towards future Pixelache events. The Case Pyhäjoki project is part of the Pixelversity 2013 programme’s ‘Techno-ecologies’ theme.
pixelache.ac/pixelversity

Hai Art (Contact person and participating artist Antye Greie-Ripatti, director of Hai Art)
Hai Art is an artist ran international art platform with focus on contemporary art forms such as new media, sound art, environmental, ecological and participatory arts with crossover to science and education to intertwine international and local programs in Hailuoto/ Finland. The main activities of Hai Art include public sound choir KAIKU, international The Wilderness Art Conference, national and international artist residencies as well as courses and workshops for children and youth. Hai Art occupies unused spaces, beaches, a ferry, forests, fields and public spaces etc. in Hailuoto.
www.haiart.net

The Finnish Bioart Society (Contact person Erich Berger)
The Finnish Bioart Society, established May 2008 in Kilpisjärvi, is an organisation supporting, producing and creating activities around art and natural sciences, especially biology. The Finnish Bioart Society is creating public discussions about biosciences, biotechnologies and bioethics. Additionally it is the Finnish contact node in international networks of bioart and art&science. The Finnish Bioart Society has currently 60 members, representing different art and research fields and other expertise – bioart, theatre, film, music, video, performance art, art&science, fine arts, media art, sculpture, environmental art, design, zoology, botany, ecology, environmental sciences, animal physiology, genetics, philosophy, cultural production, art history, engineering, etc.
www.bioartsociety.fi

Pro Hanhikivi Ry (Contact person Hanna Halmeenpää)
Pro Hanhikivi is a non-governmental organisation found in 2007 at Parhalahti village to preserve Hanhikivi Bay as a nuclear power free nature and amenity area. The organisation has 300 members (autumn 2012). Pro Hanhikivi activists collaborate with the officials both in Finland and in EU, organise Hanhikivi Days festival and other smaller event as well as try to affect in many ways to stop the nuclear power plant plan in Pyhäjoki.
www.prohanhikivi.net

via @miga.eu

INFO ACTIVISM CAMP 2013

APPLY BY FRIDAY 19th APRIL

Tactical Technology Collective

Tactical Tech is an organisation dedicated to the use of information in activism. We aim to inspire innovative campaigns and provide practical support for collecting, investigating and curating evidence for advocacy. We do this through project partnerships, trainings and developing and distributing resources.

People around the world are using digital tools and visualisation techniques to expose injustice and abuse, creating subversive narratives to challenge the status quo and mobilising for action. We call the strategic, safe and creative use of digital tools and information in campaigning information activism.

We focus on the use of data, design and technology in campaigning through our Evidence & Action programme and on helping activists understand and manage their digital security and privacy risks through our Privacy & Expression programme.

 

 

Image from https://tacticaltech.org/evidence-influence-camp-2013
Image from https://tacticaltech.org/evidence-influence-camp-2013

Evidence + Influence

Bringing practitioners together to discuss and debate, share, critique and improve ideas, solve-problems, inspire each other and develop new practices for evidence-based advocacy.

You know about Wikileaks, but do you know how journalists from The Guardian turned thousands of leaked cables into information graphics? Or how Greenpeace used publicly available data to expose the funding connections between climate change skeptics and the oil industry in the US, through Exxon Secrets? And how Kazeboon, a group of young activists in Cairo used crowd-sourced video documentation of police brutality in street screenings to educate the public and contradict the state media monopoly?

There has been a surge of innovation in working with evidence across different sectors because of access to a diverse range of publishing platforms, availability of relatively easy-to-use information gathering, documentation and visualisation tools and the sheer amount of information publicly accessible online. The ability for activists to collect and use evidence in these ways presents an exciting threshold for political influence and campaigning beyond the scope of reports, petitions and demonstrations. How can we learn across disciplines and share some of these techniques and skills?

New techniques and approaches also throw up new challenges. How do you process and analyse thousands of documents in different formats and what are the ethical implications of releasing and using data whose contents you don’t actually know and can’t verify? How can you identify storylines in data and find creative ways of representing it that engages audiences? What about the double bind of working with evidence which can be used to expose abuse and misconduct, but can also be used to entrap you and others?

To explore the answers to questions like these Tactical Tech is hosting the ‘Info-Activism Camp 2013: Evidence & Influence’. The Camp is both a skillshare and peer-learning event and a space in which to foster collaboration. We will explore new ideas and solutions that will contribute to enhancing creative & technical practices and deepening critical debates in this inter-disciplinary field. Everyone who participates in the Camp will have something to teach and to share whether it be practical and thematic advocacy experience, data wrangling skills, information design, data security techniques, collecting and handling data or creative ideas for visualising evidence for advocacy.

Our tentative agenda will focus on three different themes:

  • Collecting, finding and investigating data
  • Curating, manipulating and working through data
  • Working creatively to find and present evidence

Important discussion about data ethics, legal considerations and digital privacy and security will also be weaved in. Read more on the Info-Activism Camp 2013 and more projects from TacticalTech.

Transition & Utopia

Transitory Art

Theory & Art in Temporary Societies

MoTA – Museum of Transitory Art, Ljubljana with CIANT (Prague), BIS (Istanbul) and ARTos (Nicosia)

announce TRIBE SHARED RESIDENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN LJUBLJANA, PRAGUE, ISTANBUL, NICOSIA… as part of T.R.I.B.E. ARTIST AND RESEARCH RESIDENCIES 2013-2014

As a collaborating partner with MoTA for T-R-A-C-E-S Tea & Radio Lounge @ Transmediale10, I am thrilled to see this exciting project evolve for the Museum of Transitory Art and partners. (Jodi Rose)

T.R.I.B.E. – a new network of residency spaces in the Balkans and East Europe, dedicated to research and production of Transitory Art, launches its first open call for artistic and research residencies to take place between March 2013 and April 2014. TRIBE network aims to examine vital cultural, political and social questions in a way that will produce fresh perspectives via research and artistic outputs.

 

MORE INFO & APPLICATION: http://transitoryart.org/tribe-open-call/

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 20 April 2013

TRIBE Open call for Artist in Residence Proposals
TRIBE Open call for Artist in Residence Proposals

OPEN CALL FOR TRIBE RESIDENCIES 2013

for ARTISTS and RESEARCHERS

 

WHAT IS A TRIBE RESIDENCY?

A TRIBE residency is a production or research residency for artists and researchers taking place in at least one and maximum three cities – Ljubljana, Prague, Istanbul, Nicosia, Belgrade & other locations. TRIBE is a network interested in forming a mobile group of artists and researchers to participate in explorations, discussions, interventions and innovations related to the first TRIBE theme: Transition & Utopia.

Works produced will be exhibited in two exhibitions taking place in Istanbul, Turkey and Ljubljana, Slovenia. Common events for TRIBE group, workshops and a symposium for researchers will take place in Nicosia, Cyprus.

 

WE ARE LOOKING FOR PROJECTS INCLUDING:

1) (Monumental) public space interventions

2) Live art and symbols of nationalism (such as flash mobs/live art actions)

3) Projects researching transitions from analogue to digital media, obsolete technolgies and futurisms

TRANSITORY ART = PUBLIC SPACE RELATED PRACTICES + EPHEMERAL (TIME BASED) PRACTICES + POETIC & TECHNOLOGICAL CRITICAL MEDIA ARTWORKS

 

TO APPLY PLEASE PROVIDE:

– A project proposal

– Motivation for why you would like to work in the context of this particular residency (how its mission relates to your proposed project)

– How and why would you describe your work as transitory?

– A technical description and project development plan (including an indication of your planning divided between the organizations, i.e. what would you like to develop where and why – if applicable)

– A draft budget proposal

ONLY APPLICATIONS SUBMITTED THROUGH THE ONLINE APPLICATION SYSTEM WILL BE REVIEWED. PLEASE DO NOT SEND APPLICATIONS IN ANY OTHER WAY.

 

THEME: TRANSITION AND UTOPIA

Transition can be seen in acute forms in current political and social conditions and in the accelerated transition of social, religious and economic notions of value. In a situation of constant dislocation and perceived loss of values Transitory Art can play a vital role in adjusting perceptions and bringing forward new forms, considering and analysing not only longer-term solutions and structures, but also smaller, short-term interventions that can help trigger processes of change including at the socio- and geo-political level.

While the Balkans did enjoy a period of so-called independence they are now increasingly subject to historical Austro-Hungarian interests in new forms and re-entering a state of disempowered conomic dependence. This is accompanied by a loss of respect for human rights in Europe accompanied by growing nationalism at the European centre as well as the peripheries.

Both centre and periphery are experiencing an ever-harsher capitalist regime. This intensifies processes of migration from and across the Balkans. These conditions generate social, cultural and political uncertainty and a related lack of vision and leadership at a time when much of the region’s populations remain traumatised by constantly changing and deteriorating life conditions.

The forced and even catastrophic transitions occurring at all levels of human existence (intellectual, political, personal, media) produces widespread disorientation. Transitory Art is a process which responds to the consequences of transitional ‘realities’ which create such a widespread state of fear and uncertainty, and social and mental dead-ends.

In the current state, change seems an utopia. We believe that the role of art is to allow a space for the possibility of change, generating fresh perspectives and propose new solutions. We search for concepts and ideas in which the citizens of a dreamless Europe regain their power to change.

We are looking for critical artists working in the field of media and transitory art, interventions and exploratory critical researchers and curators. The project focuses on the Balkans and the East but welcomes projects adressing the theme in a broader way.

Online application form + more information on the theme: http://transitoryart.org/tribe-submission/

All applicants will be informed by 15 May 2013.

Date: 11.03.2013 – 20.04.2013
Project website: www.transitoryart.org

RUN COMPUTER RUN

Economics and the Immaterial

Glitch_Casey

CALL FOR ARTWORKS

How do we give value to immaterial goods? How do we buy and sell digital images? What is the relationship between economics and digital aesthetics? How can curators and artists create new platforms and models for the creation of economic exchange? These are some of the questions that this show attempts to answer. We are currently accepting artwork (video, jpg, gifs, 3d models or HTML content) that will feature in a unique gallery-based exhibition. The exhibition is composed of two parts – a gallery-sited virtual show, and the online production and distribution of materially-realised limited-edition goods.

In the gallery, each artist will be represented by an AR-code – an augmented reality marker embedded with visual information that can only be viewed with the aid of a computer or smart-phone. As visitors walk through the gallery, they can interact with the markers using either their smart-phone or one of the tablets that will be provided by the gallery.

The artwork submitted will then be produced as a series of limited-edition goods including apparel and digital prints. These goods will be made available online for the duration of GLITCH.

The following products will be produced for each artist included in this exhibition:
1 Limited Edition Tee (run of 20)
1 Limited Edition tote bag (run of 20)
1 A5 postcard
1 A3 digital print (run of 30)

These goods will be made available via this website for the duration of GLITCH.

All profits from the sale of these goods go to the corresponding artist.



Before submitting please consult our technical spec for file types, and use our templates for submitting work.

Artwork that is not sent according to the technical spec or design templates will not be accepted as submissions.



Artworks will be exhibited using the Layar platform

Submission guidelines:
Email hello@runcomputerrun.com with the following information:
– completed templates

- artist name
– short bio (max 100 words, English only)
– email, url
– work name & synopsis (max 100 words, English only)
– screenshots x 2 (jpg 800 x 600px)

All artworks must adhere to our technical specification.
One entry per artist

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Deadline for entries: May 5th 2013

All submissions will be considered by the GLITCH curatorial team. Artists will be notified by May 12th 2013. Artwork will be exhibited during Glitch festival at Rua Red in Dublin, Ireland from May 24 – July 13

RUN COMPUTER, RUN
25th May – 13th July
Curated by Nora O’Murchú

Glitch, our annual Digital Arts Festival returns!

Run Computer, Run takes over both RUA RED galleries and showcases how creative technologies provide us with a critical lens to examine our everyday culture. From augmented reality, to video games, and interactive artworks, both our gallery and website will show how digital artists are taking on some of the key social, economic, political and cultural issues that challenge how the Internet is changing.

This years’ Glitch features a gallery based show from Casey Reas, Marius Watz, FIELD and David Szauder that examines how the aesthetic and platforms of code has transformed from screen based interfaces to mobile platforms, print, 3d printing, and moving image.