If you can’t make it to Venice for the Biennale, you can still experience the floating radio – listen as you read this personal essay about the political highlights by Maura Reilly. Alternatively, J J Charlesworth tears apart the moral contradictions of the jet set global art world in this article Playing Politics.

Venice Radio! Safina Radio Project is an itinerant space, a boat transformed into a recording studio navigating the Venetian waterways and transporting passengers from one place to another whilst serving as a platform for exploration and exchange. The project creates transitory and transient communities with each journey, bringing focus to collective experience and targeting an investigation into how we locate ourselves and how we mediate our human and historic commonality. Safina_Radio_f0626_may6_alserkal_img The online portal includes the full program in Venice from May 6 to 8, presented alongside a range of content commissioned only for the site itself, from written interviews to audio projects, playlists and sets. Contributors of online-specific content include: British artist Scanner (Robin Rimbaud) whose work experiments with sound, space, image and form; Emirati conceptual artist and writer Hassan Sharif; Wael Hattar in conversation with artist Sadik Kwaish Alfraji; Rahel Aima and Ahmad Makia from The State; artists Lawrence Abu Hamdan and Karim Sultan; music contributions from UAE based Analog Room and Kamal Rasool (Flamingods); and MENASA music specialist Neil van der Linden. The Safina Radio Project builds on Alserkal Avenue’s expanding homegrown programme which aims to support performance, social practice and public-forms of art, by providing a unifying public forum amidst the Venice Biennale to engage with questions and concerns important to the region. The project is realised through the kind support of Abdelmonem Bin Eisa Alserkal, Founder of Alserkal Avenue. A broad spectrum of artists, writers and curators, whose practices draw from a variety of contexts, will participate in Venice through conversations and happenings on the boat, including: Raqs Media Collective, comprised of media practitioners Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula, and Shuddhabrata Sengupta from New Delhi; British artist, writer and film director John Akomfrah with writer Coline Milliard; artists Mohammed Kazem and Cristiana de Marchi; artist Rabab Ghazoul in conversation with her father; artists Haig Aivazian, Rene Gabri, Ayreen Anastas, Hrair Sarkissian and filmmakers Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi with curator Adelina Cüberyan von Fürstenberg; collaborative artists Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige; artists Wafaa Bilal and Sara Raza; and performance artist Alex Baczynski Jenkins with curators Louise O’Kelly (Block University), Ben Roberts (Modern Art Oxford), Rose Lejeune and Fatos Ustek. An audio recording of each live event will be uploaded to the website safinaradioproject.org within 24 hours of it taking place, opening up experiences and events in Venice to a wider audience.

Le Mouvement – Performing the City
The 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in 2014, curated by Gianni Jetzer and Chris Sharp, continues the innovative spirit of the format by offering the most radical edition yet. True to its provocative legacy of 60 years, Le Mouvement will challenge the very definition of public art by creating no sculpture at all. The 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in Biel/Bienne will be solely dedicated to performance.

Symposium with the participation of Jean-Luc Nancy, Bojana Cvejić, Gianni Jetzer, André Lepecki, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Hans Rudolf Reust, Peter J. Schneemann, Chris Sharp, Thomas Strässle, Jan Verwoert, as well as the artists Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, and Ariana Reines

Le Mouvement is a multipart exhibition, which investigates the nature of sculpture and public space by hosting multiple performances in the town of Biel/Bienne. The show touches upon a variety of inter-related topics and issues, which include:

–The nature and uses of public space
–Art in public space
–The individual and collective body in public space—both static and in movement
–The relationship between the fleeting materiality of the body and the more permanent materiality of sculpture

Rirkrit Tiravanija, "U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller)," 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Rirkrit Tiravanija, “U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller),” 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Uniting a heterogeneous group of art historians, theorists, curators and artists to discuss these points, the symposium intends to harness the knowledge of these different disciplines in hopes of gaining a greater and more nuanced understanding of performance in public space and the current nature of public space itself.

In co-operation with the Contemporary Art History Department of the University of Bern, Bern, and Y Institute of the Bern University of the Arts (BUA), Bern

Symposium in English
French translation provided / Admission is free / Limited seating, please reserve symposium@lemouvement.ch

Press contact
Patrick Steffen, patrick.steffen@ess-spa.ch

Upcoming programming:
Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31, all three movements in parallel

Mouvement I – Sculptures on the Move
July 4–August 31

With reconfigured sculptures by Olivier Mosset, Franz Eggenschwiler, Carl Burckhardt, Max Bill and performances by Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, Ariana Reines

Mouvement II – Performing the City
August 26–31

With performances in public space by luciana achugar, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Nina Beier, Trisha Brown, Pablo Bronstein, Eglè Budvytytè, Willi Dorner, Douglas Dunn, Simone Forti, Alicia Frankovich, Maria Hassabi, San Keller, Köppl/Začek, Jirí Kovanda, Germaine Kruip, Liz Magic Laser, Myriam Lefkowitz, Jérôme Leuba, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Alexandra Pirici, Prinz Gholam, Lin Yilin

Mouvement III – The City Performed
August 30–November 2
Opening: August 30, 5pm
Kunsthaus CentrePasquArt, Biel/Bienne

Vito Acconci, Francis Alÿs, Pablo Bronstein, Stanley Brouwn, Trisha Brown, Paulo Bruscky, Martin Creed, Felipe Ehrenberg, VALIE EXPORT, Dara Friedman, Gelitin, Tomislav Gotovac, Alberto Greco, Anna Halprin, Maria Hassabi, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Sanja Iveković, Christian Jankowski, Jirí Kovanda, Liz Magic Laser, Klara Lidén, Marko Lulić, Babette Mangolte, Rachel Mason, Dave McKenzie, Dieter Meier, Ocaña, Neša Paripović, Ewa Partum, Alexandra Pirici, Miervaldis Polis, Kim Sooja, Mladen Stilinović, Beat Streuli, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ulla von Brandenburg, Ai Weiwei

For further information, please contact info@lemouvement.ch

National conference on socially engaged art
November 6–8, 2014

Call for participation
Proposal deadline: July 14, 2014

Cleveland Institute of Art
11141 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44106

unruly_cfp

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Are we talking about art that resists the conventional structures of the art world and re-imagines a new, unwieldy public sphere of social activism in the face of media spectacle and profit motives? Or can social practices in art reconcile aesthetic focus with external forces or agencies with regard for communities, perhaps affecting a timely catalyst for change? The recent spate of publications on what has been variously called community-based art, participatory art, collaborative art, relational art, social practice or socially engaged art, indicates that such questions have provoked a variety of studies that intellectually tackle what Shannon Jackson has noted as the “social turn.”

This conference, “Unruly Engagements: On the Social Turn in Contemporary Art and Design,” proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades or so. Among our primary objectives is to facilitate public discourse on the feasibility of interventionist projects in art and design in urban environments, with special attention to “rust-belt” cities like Cleveland.

We invite presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

–Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
–Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
–Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
–Urban design and design in the city as force for change
–Aesthetics, ethics and politics
–Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF-formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to:
Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira, unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Conference schedule and registration details will be posted in early autumn.

“Unruly Engagements” is a key component of Community Works: Artist as Social Agent, CIA’s yearlong commitment to exploring social agency and the visual arts.

The deadline for proposals is July 14.

About Shannon Jackson
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is Professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center. Professor Jackson was recently selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship for 2014–15. Her most recent book is Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge, 2011), and she is working on a book about The Builders Association. Her previous books are Lines of Activity: Performance, Historiography, and Hull-House Domesticity (2000) and Professing Performance: Theatre in the Academy from Philology to Performativity (2004).

About Cleveland Institute of Art
Founded in 1882, the Cleveland Institute of Art is an accredited, independent college of art and design offering 15 majors in studio art, digital art, craft disciplines, and design. CIA extends its programming to the public through gallery exhibitions; lectures; a robust continuing education program; and the Cinematheque, a year-round art and independent film program. For more information visit cia.edu.

The Safe Itinerant / The Insecurity of Mobility

A mobile workshop, seminar, performance, between Berlin and Luneberg August 14, 2013

 

Leaving from Berlin Haupbahnhof, concluding at the Post Media Lab in Luneberg

Organized by micha cárdenas with support from the Post Media Lab

Featuring the work of: Zach Blas / micha cárdenas / Tikul / NM Rosen / Pinar Yoldas

 

We are safe when we walk.

We have walked for generations.

Your colonial regimes want to stop us, name and identify us.

We won’t be stopped by your policing violence,

We won’t be named by your regimes.

 

From Oscar Grant, a black man killed in San Francisco at a public train station by private train police, to the 2012 sexual assault of a woman by a group of men on bus in New Delhi, India, repeatedly the promises of urban mobility are belied by the violence that is used to police spaces of transit and the ways that access to mobility is regulated. This performance / seminar will consider the themes of mobility, violence and access, using the actual space of transit, the train and train station, as the space of performance, discussion and presentation. The performance is part of the project Local Autonomy Networks, by micha cárdenas, which works towards networks of community based responses to violence through performance and dance. This part of the series will consider how trans-local networks of safety can be imagined within spaces which are intensely regulated yet fall between the lines of local regulations. Engaging with the Post Media Lab’s theme of Organization After Networks, this performance will consider how communities can organize for safety after their lives have been shaped by inter-urban and transnational transportation networks.

Themes to be addressed:

  • The cloud versus a home / colonial dream of mobility versus de-colonial construction
  • Safety in Numbers / Gendering of Public Space
  • The Itinerant scholar / the safe itinerant / the itinerant artist
  • The Insecurity of mobility / gender/sexuality/race in transit and across borders
  • From passport checks to biometric mobility controls
  • Ticketing systems / E-Ticketing
  • The price of speed / The cost of easy border crossing
  • Mobile Public Space / From Public to Corporate Transit / Public Interstitial Space
  • The promise of mobility / Disability and access

Inspired by The Political Equator my daily sense of danger and my daily experiences of harassment and violence (micha cárdenas)

To join, use the following itinerary for DB
Halt Datum Zeit Gleis Fahrt Reservierung
Berlin Hbf (tief) 14.08. ab 12:16 7
Hamburg Hbf 14.08. an 13:57 5a/b, ICE 1612
Hamburg Hbf 14.08. ab 14:53 14a/b
Lüneburg 14.08. an 15:25 1, ICE 681

Movements of disturbance: Excess ecology, post-digital networks, and queer illegibility.

This screening and panel includes three research-based artist presentations that use political disturbance to speculate, envision, and perform posthuman, metahuman, and unhuman futures.

16:00-18:00

Wed 7th August 2013

//

Pinar Yoldas, Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, Duke University

“An Ecosystem of Excess” An Ecosystem of Excess is an attempt to create a post-human eco-system, a living community of speculative organisms and their environment. The project takes the idea that we are surrounded by “man-made extreme environments” as its starting point. According to the primordial soup theory, about four billion years ago life starts in the oceans when inorganic matter turns into organic molecules. Today, the oceans have turned into a plastic soup . This project asks a very simple question:”If life started today in the oceans of plastic, what kind of life forms would emerge out of this contemporary primordial ooze? To answer this question the project suggests a series of interconnected species burgeoning in pelagic plastic, chemical sludge and other debris.

Micha Cárdenas, Media Arts + Practice, University of Southern California

“Building the Movements to Keep Us Safe” Local Autonomy Networks (Autonets) is an artivist project focused on creating digital and non-digital networks of communication to increase community autonomy and reduce violence against women, LGBTQI people, people of color and other groups who continue to survive violence on a daily basis. Autonets considers how movement is a technology that can be used for decolonization and how dance and performance can be used to develop networks for community based responses to violence.

Zach Blas, Literature, Information Science + Information Studies, Visual Studies, Duke University

“Queer Illegibility and the Facial Weaponization Suite” Facial Weaponization Suite develops forms of collective, artistic protest against biometric facial recognition, global surveillance, and informatic capture–as well as the inequalities these technologies propagate–by making masks in community-based workshops that are used for public intervention and performance. These masks are forms of queer escape and opacity that refuse the parsing, categorizing, and calculations of standardized, normalized recognition and perception registers; the masks attempt to generate a presence that is illegible to such forms of control. One mask in the suite, the Fag Face Mask, is a response to scientific studies that link determining sexual orientation through rapid facial recognition. This mask is generated from the biometric facial data of many queer men’s faces, resulting in a mutated, alien facial mask that cannot be read or parsed by biometric facial recognition technologies.

///

Micha Cardenas, Zach Bas and Pinar Yoldas Think Tank Program

PLATOON . cultural development schönhauser allee 9 10119 berlin . germany
tel: +49-(0)30-2888-2160
berlin@kunsthalle.com

http://www.kunsthalle.com/berlin
http://www.platoon.org

parking lot available!

HOW TO GET HERE

by public transportation
U2 to Senefelder Platz, walk south (2min)
U2, M8, Bus 142 to Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, walk north (2min)
U8 to Rosenthaler Platz, walk east (6min)

Case Pyhäjoki – Artistic reflections on nuclear influence
Transdisciplinary expedition, production workshop and events

Location: Pyhäjoki, Finland
Time: 31.7. – 12.8.2013
For: artists, activists, scientists, thinkers and doers + everything and opinion in-between.

Deadline to apply: 5.5.2013 (e-mail letter of motivation to mkk[-at-]katastro.fi)

Initiated by artist Mari Keski-Korsu, now a collaboration between artist-organiser and researcher Andrew Paterson/Pixelache, musician and artist Antye Greie-Ripatti/Hai Art, Finnish Bioart Society and Pro Hanhikivi.

‘Case Pyhäjoki – Artistic reflections on nuclear influence’ is a transdisciplinary artistic expedition, production workshop and presentation events in Pyhäjoki, North Ostrobothnia, Finland 31st of July to 12th of August 2013. The sixth nuclear power plant of Finland is planned to be built at Hanhikivi Cape in Pyhäjoki.

The aim of the project is to explore artistic perspectives on the vast changes planned in Pyhäjoki, through the planning of a nuclear power plant at the site, and this way of considering energy production and consuming in the world. Artists can not only reflect upon and depict social phenomena and socio-economical relations, but can also situate themselves in between politics, activism and science. Can art make changes? If so, what would be the creative tools of activism? Life itself has become increasingly politicised in the new millennium and obviously this reflects on us all. There are plenty of art works that comment on issues seen unethical or wrong, revealing different kinds of world views. Also, there are community art projects that comment for example social condition that involve participants from different fields. But can the border in between art and activism be blurred more? Could it be involving yet aesthetical? Aren’t we all activists? What are other ways of activism in addition what we are used to think? And what is the change we are after? The nuclear power plant in Pyhäjoki is a concrete project that connects many aspects from NGO-activity, politics, local and global economical situation to energy production and consumption expectations as well as decreasing natural resources.

No to 6. nuclear power plant, sign at Parhalahti village in Pyhäjoki, 2012.

The local situation in Pyhäjoki, and the planned nuclear power plant, is a case example for the workshop. People have formed strong opinions about the plant. The small community in the area has divided into those who are for and those who are against the power plant project. The aim of the expedition is to familiarise well with the current conditions in Pyhäjoki and try to collaborate with the local community, although many questions may be raised with are not easy. Could art work in between the two polarised opinions about the power plant? What kind of political process leads to the power plant plan? What does it mean to a small, agricultural community like Pyhäjoki or Ostrobothnia area? What does it mean at the national and global level? Can nuclear power mitigate climate change? Does nuclear power make Finland energy independent? What are the alternatives to nuclear power i.e. zero growth or new means of renewable energy production etc? Pyhäjoki is an excellent case study during the times of continuing ecological, social and economical crisis of the different path choices which humankind can take in order to flourish.

The first days of the expedition are for discussions, presentations (both local, national and international researchers, activists and artists), getting to know the area and its’ people with trips and excursions. The rest of the days are dedicated for independent or group work that can lead to e.g. a project demo, plan, performance, artistic action tools, discussion event, intervention etc. locally or creating overall action structures that can be implemented elsewhere. There will be a final public presentation and if needed a small exhibition for demos, ideas and documentations in the end of this production workshop. The aim is to have something concrete in our hands in the end to continue the work in the future.

The presentations by different experts during the workshop are open to public.

PRACTICAL DETAILS

Please send your letter of motivation to Mari Keski-Korsu mkk[-at-]katastro.fi by 5th of May 2013.

Case Pyhäjoki -project covers the participants travel, accommodation and per diems. There is also a possibility for documentation fee in the end. We will accommodate in a cozy Holiday Village Kielosaari / www.kielosaari.fi and utilise some other spaces in Pyhäjoki.

The travel dates are 31st of July and 12th of August.

The selected participants will be contacted in the beginning of May 2013.

ORGANISERS AND SUPPORT

Case Pyhäjoki was initiated by artist Mari Keski-Korsu and is now a collaboration in between artist-organiser and researcher Andrew Paterson/Pixelache, musician and artist Antye Greie-Ripatti/Hai Art, Finnish Bioart Society and Pro Hanhikivi. Please read more about the organisers in the end of this e-mail.

Case Pyhäjoki is funded by Kone Foundation / www.koneensaatio.fi and Arts Promotion Centre of Finland / www.taike.fi.

BACKGROUND INFO

The actual building location of the nuclear power plant is Hanhikivi Cape. 65% of the area is nature preservation with rich marine flora and fauna. It is also a rare land lifting shore where the land is still rising up from the sea due to processes of the last Ice age. There is no industry or energy production at the cape. The infrastructure for the nuclear power plant will be build as new in a so called greenfield location. Even thought the building of the plant will last for years, we are living the last moments to experience Hanhikivi as it is now. More information at http://www.hanhikivi.net

The nuclear power plant is hoped to bring prosperity to the local community but there are still many people against the building plan. People are scared to loose their land, homes and all the risks the nuclear power production brings. Recently, the company responsible of the project Fennovoima Oy announced the plan to store the nuclear waste materials also at the Pyhäjoki plant, as the Finnish long-term nuclear waste material storage ‘Olkiluoto/Onkalo’ may not be able to store all the country’s nuclear waste. In autumn 2012, the German energy company E-on resigned from the Pyhäjoki Nuclear Power Plant project. It was the biggest investor in the project and was considered to have the best know-how of the building process. Other international nuclear energy partners have been approached to replace E-on.

The biggest town close to Pyhäjoki is Raahe and the neighbouring municipalities including Pyhäjoki have been very much dependent on one big employer, steel factory Rautaruukki Oy, established in Raahe in 1960. It was seen as an answer to economical despair after the local shipping companies declined, and now that Rautaruukki has been laying off people. Hence, the nuclear power plant is seen to bring new jobs and basically repeat the economic promise that Rautaruukki brought to the area previously. Another point of view is also that the plant can produce energy for the needs of the steel factory.
www.raahe.fi
www.pyhajoki.fi

MORE INFO ABOUT THE ORGANISERS AND PARTNERS

Mari Keski-Korsu (Artist, initiator of the project, organiser, born in Raahe)
Mari Keski-Korsu (mkk) is an transdisciplinary artist. She explores how ecological and socio-economical changes manifest in people’s everyday life. Her works have a political nature with a humorous twist. The basis of the work is in location, a place and people’s relations to it. Keski-Korsu started her artistic career with photography and then started to work with internet live streaming in the mid 1990′. This lead her to work with live video visualisations as well as net and video art, interventions, documentary, installations and location based art. She is interested in relations in between art, politics and science. The works has been exhibited in Europe and in several other countries around the world. She collaborates with artist groups, scientists as well as organises and curates different types of projects.
www.artsufartsu.net

Pixelache (Contact person and participating artist Andrew Paterson)
Pixelache, based in Helsinki, is a transdisciplinary platform for experimental art, design, research and activism. Amongst our fields of interest are: experimental interaction and electronics; renewable energy production/use; bioarts and art-science culture; grassroot organising and networks; politics and economics of media/technology; alternative economy cultures; VJ culture and audiovisual performances; media literacy and engaging environmental issues. Pixelversity, its outreach and education programme since 2010, aims to be a ‘learning bridge’ between practitioners, cultural and non-profit organisations, interested individuals and larger institutions, and an outreach programme extending beyond Helsinki. Consideration is given to the relationships between the different activities, and how they may build up accumulative knowledge and skills towards future Pixelache events. The Case Pyhäjoki project is part of the Pixelversity 2013 programme’s ‘Techno-ecologies’ theme.
pixelache.ac/pixelversity

Hai Art (Contact person and participating artist Antye Greie-Ripatti, director of Hai Art)
Hai Art is an artist ran international art platform with focus on contemporary art forms such as new media, sound art, environmental, ecological and participatory arts with crossover to science and education to intertwine international and local programs in Hailuoto/ Finland. The main activities of Hai Art include public sound choir KAIKU, international The Wilderness Art Conference, national and international artist residencies as well as courses and workshops for children and youth. Hai Art occupies unused spaces, beaches, a ferry, forests, fields and public spaces etc. in Hailuoto.
www.haiart.net

The Finnish Bioart Society (Contact person Erich Berger)
The Finnish Bioart Society, established May 2008 in Kilpisjärvi, is an organisation supporting, producing and creating activities around art and natural sciences, especially biology. The Finnish Bioart Society is creating public discussions about biosciences, biotechnologies and bioethics. Additionally it is the Finnish contact node in international networks of bioart and art&science. The Finnish Bioart Society has currently 60 members, representing different art and research fields and other expertise – bioart, theatre, film, music, video, performance art, art&science, fine arts, media art, sculpture, environmental art, design, zoology, botany, ecology, environmental sciences, animal physiology, genetics, philosophy, cultural production, art history, engineering, etc.
www.bioartsociety.fi

Pro Hanhikivi Ry (Contact person Hanna Halmeenpää)
Pro Hanhikivi is a non-governmental organisation found in 2007 at Parhalahti village to preserve Hanhikivi Bay as a nuclear power free nature and amenity area. The organisation has 300 members (autumn 2012). Pro Hanhikivi activists collaborate with the officials both in Finland and in EU, organise Hanhikivi Days festival and other smaller event as well as try to affect in many ways to stop the nuclear power plant plan in Pyhäjoki.
www.prohanhikivi.net

via @miga.eu

INFO ACTIVISM CAMP 2013

APPLY BY FRIDAY 19th APRIL

Tactical Technology Collective

Tactical Tech is an organisation dedicated to the use of information in activism. We aim to inspire innovative campaigns and provide practical support for collecting, investigating and curating evidence for advocacy. We do this through project partnerships, trainings and developing and distributing resources.

People around the world are using digital tools and visualisation techniques to expose injustice and abuse, creating subversive narratives to challenge the status quo and mobilising for action. We call the strategic, safe and creative use of digital tools and information in campaigning information activism.

We focus on the use of data, design and technology in campaigning through our Evidence & Action programme and on helping activists understand and manage their digital security and privacy risks through our Privacy & Expression programme.

 

 

Image from https://tacticaltech.org/evidence-influence-camp-2013
Image from https://tacticaltech.org/evidence-influence-camp-2013

Evidence + Influence

Bringing practitioners together to discuss and debate, share, critique and improve ideas, solve-problems, inspire each other and develop new practices for evidence-based advocacy.

You know about Wikileaks, but do you know how journalists from The Guardian turned thousands of leaked cables into information graphics? Or how Greenpeace used publicly available data to expose the funding connections between climate change skeptics and the oil industry in the US, through Exxon Secrets? And how Kazeboon, a group of young activists in Cairo used crowd-sourced video documentation of police brutality in street screenings to educate the public and contradict the state media monopoly?

There has been a surge of innovation in working with evidence across different sectors because of access to a diverse range of publishing platforms, availability of relatively easy-to-use information gathering, documentation and visualisation tools and the sheer amount of information publicly accessible online. The ability for activists to collect and use evidence in these ways presents an exciting threshold for political influence and campaigning beyond the scope of reports, petitions and demonstrations. How can we learn across disciplines and share some of these techniques and skills?

New techniques and approaches also throw up new challenges. How do you process and analyse thousands of documents in different formats and what are the ethical implications of releasing and using data whose contents you don’t actually know and can’t verify? How can you identify storylines in data and find creative ways of representing it that engages audiences? What about the double bind of working with evidence which can be used to expose abuse and misconduct, but can also be used to entrap you and others?

To explore the answers to questions like these Tactical Tech is hosting the ‘Info-Activism Camp 2013: Evidence & Influence’. The Camp is both a skillshare and peer-learning event and a space in which to foster collaboration. We will explore new ideas and solutions that will contribute to enhancing creative & technical practices and deepening critical debates in this inter-disciplinary field. Everyone who participates in the Camp will have something to teach and to share whether it be practical and thematic advocacy experience, data wrangling skills, information design, data security techniques, collecting and handling data or creative ideas for visualising evidence for advocacy.

Our tentative agenda will focus on three different themes:

  • Collecting, finding and investigating data
  • Curating, manipulating and working through data
  • Working creatively to find and present evidence

Important discussion about data ethics, legal considerations and digital privacy and security will also be weaved in. Read more on the Info-Activism Camp 2013 and more projects from TacticalTech.