Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire

6 June–31 August 2014

In a practice that poetically blends documentary and fiction, Bertille Bak is developing a unique way of thinking about her contemporaries. As an observer of communities forming and breaking up within delimited territories, she works less like an entomologist pinning down species than with the dreamlike recreation of rituals considered as bearing witness to forms of collective living.

Whether it concerns her own community in the mining areas of Northern France or groups that are unfamiliar to her, she never chooses to distance herself or look on from afar. On the contrary, it is all about sharing a passage of life, a struggle, a resistance. For Bertille Bak, the projects are therefore set in a period of time, several months in general, during which she immerses herself in a reality and in everyday life, establishing herself there and making connections with groups who often live in precarious circumstances close to disintegration.

This is how she came to be interested in the inhabitants of an area of Bangkok under threat from a shopping development, staging the implosion of one of the apartment blocks at the end of a revolutionary swan song in Morse code light flashes. Or again in the Roma encampment of Ivry-sur-Seine in the Parisian suburbs, their forced silence and the inevitable dissimulation that awaits them.

Together with members of the communities, she elaborates a scenario in which people who are ordinarily constrained to passive resistance, and a sort of invisibility, become the actors of their own stories within their usual environments: the everyday replayed, amplified and redirected blending with the fiction imagined by the artist.

BertilleBak_TourofBabel

In Saint-Nazaire, where she has been a resident artist at Le Grand Café over the last two years, Bertille Bak has also formulated a locally anchored project that seeks to reveal sometimes hidden realities. She is interested in the shipyards, by the mechanical ballet of the machines, and she wishes to accentuate the people who work on the construction of the most sumptuous cruise ships and the crew on board these sea-going giants.

Their community is no longer bound by a common history and is first of all defined through work and the sharing of limited time and space, in which everyone has to find their place.

For this exhibition, the artist has produced a film in which the cruise liner, the recreation of a territorially delimited microcosm in the middle of international waters, is chosen as one of the background elements. With its set of spaces reserved for tourists and forbidden to employees, the cruise ship universe engenders a kind of regimented choreography, where zones reserved for some are forbidden to others.

Elegantly titled The Tour of Babel in reference to these partly invisible communities of different nationalities and individualities, this presentation will very certainly mix objects that evoke the rituals of seamen and women, as well as their voyages and their occasionally absurd comings and goings.

Bertille Bak
The Tour of Babel
6 June–31 August 2014

Le Grand Café, Contemporary Art Centre, Saint-Nazaire
Place des Quatre z’horloges
44 600 Saint-Nazaire
France
Hours:
TuesdaySunday 11am–7pm

Curator: Sophie Legrandjacques, director of Le Grand Café – Contemporary Art Centre
Press contact: Alexandra Servel,  servela@mairie-saintnazaire.fr / T + 33 2 44 73 44 05
Text: Camille Paulhan

 Visual Agency

Featuring:
Omar Kholeif on Shuruq Harb
Vanessa Joan Müller on Özlem Altin
Jens Maier-Rothe on Malak Helmy
Column by Alanna Lockward

The starting point for the current issue was initially summed up with the term “visual agency.” The increase in dissemination channels and the accompanying (at least potential) publicness of visual narratives has resulted in the fact that there is hardly any more control over the contexts in which images circulate and how they are perceived, interpreted, commented on, and exploited. In the (relatively new) mass media euphemistically called “social” networks, images in any case alternate unchecked between the registers of fiction, authenticity and fetish, between evidence and manipulation, criticism and affirmation, and pass through the most varied and contrasting contexts. How do matters therefore stand with respect to the agency of images under these circumstances of the unshackling of the visual? What strategies do artists select to produce a specific context, to occupy the specific site of a visual assertion? How do they react to the routes of appropriation and reinterpretation to which the images lose their title and credits? What is still suppressed so that it cannot become visible? Such questions lead to an idea—of any type whatsoever—of a “site” of images that might be constructed and from which they can be read. Yet, just as what can be seen and what can be said are linked by the boundary that separates them, the contributions in this issue are connected to the idea of their conception in that they oppose or at least, however, shift it.

Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.
Malak Helmy, Notes from the Carbon Coast (still), 2010. Video, colour, sound, 2:39 minutes.

Shuruq Harb’s The Keeper—which was published in 2011 as a limited book edition—at the same time also comprises an installation and a performance and makes use of the archive of Mustafa, a street vendor in Ramallah, who prints out images from the Internet and sells them in boxes. In the past, Mustafa’s family still imported images, for instance, from China, Lebanon, or Syria. In 2010, Harb acquired some 2,000 of such unsold images and sifted through and arranged them together for The Keeper. This archive documents a changing access to images and a change in how they circulate. Many of these images were at times officially barely accessible or even banned, which is why the archive traces the history of image regimes—public as well as private—and thus represents a specific form of distribution of the sensible.

The work of Özlem Altin is linked with that of Shuruq Harb by the work on or from an archive. Central motifs in her oeuvre are the human body and the codes that it emits. In this, Vanessa Joan Müller, however, finds a subtle moment of the uncanny in and between her images, in the sense of a relationship between the animate and the inanimate that has become blurred, between the body and its eidetic double, which has solidified into a nature morte. The frozen poses, mute gestures, and motionless individuals subject them- selves to the discriminating gaze as objects and yet escape it again and again. What might seem to be a system of ordering can instead be described better through a type of stream of images and image layouts, an ongoing constructing and deconstructing of meanings, references and aesthetics.

Malak Helmy’s contribution goes back to a co-operation on an exhibition between Camera Austria and Beirut last autumn. Unexpected Encounters focused on the translation errors in political and cultural transfer. Malak Helmy participated in this exhibition with a sound work that took the mimetic abilities of the lyrebird as its starting point for addressing questions of identity and subjectivity. In his text contribution, Jens Maier-Rothe also writes about birds, migratory birds and their navigation skills. They always follow the same routes, in which their flight also seems to be a surveying of historical space. The artist pursues these traces in Egypt, a land of change, in which channels of communication decay like the coordinates of everyday life.

Camera Austria International 
published quarterly, 100 pages, German / English

Orders: www.camera-austria.at/shop

Rampa Istanbul

4 June–12 July 2014

Rampa’s first group exhibition this secret world that exists right there in public brings together the works of Etel Adnan, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin, Francis Alÿs, Otto Berchem, Attila Csörgő, Ergin Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz Çekil, Nilbar Güreş, Berat Işık, Çağdaş Kahriman, Yasemin Özcan, Funda Özgünaydın, İz Öztat & Zişan, Kiki Smith, and Ali Taptık.

Co-curated by Lara Fresko and Esra Sarıgedik Öktem, the exhibition takes its inception and title from a scene in Noah Baumbach’s 2012 film Frances Ha, in which Frances, talking to strangers in semi-drunken fervor, points out a fleeting moment when the transformative potential of love as well as the miracle of unmediated communication is rendered possible and visible. Focusing on the potentials of interpersonal relations and social movements to envision alternative worlds, the exhibition brings together works from different histories and geographies.

Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.
Otto Berchem, We are The Revolution (detail), 2013. Gouache and
pencil on Hahnemühle paper, 30 x 38 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Three central works explore the many facets of travel, crossing borders, creating channels of communication, instituting solidarity, storytelling and imagining utopian and dystopian alternatives through a cartographic approach. In The Loop (1997) Francis Alÿs takes an unexpected route to go from Tijuana to San Diego without crossing the Mexico/United States border. In a similar vein, Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin’s diptych piece Black Sea Map / Kéraban Lé Têtu (1999) follows Jules Verne’s stubborn tobacco merchant in a journey all the way around the Black Sea in order to get to Istanbul’s Asian coast without crossing the Bosphorus. A remnant of what became an unfinished project of the artist to forge networks of communication among the contemporary art scenes of Turkey with its northern neighbors is not only a vision of alternative routes but also a cultural project of solidarity formation. İz Öztat & Zişan’s collaboration consists of a drawing of the Island of Paradise/Possessed (1915–17) by a fin de siecle avant-garde artist Zişan, that takes the form of three letters that spell both Paradise and Possessed in Ottoman script. Within their cross generational relationship, Zişan’s departure point for the map draws İz Öztat into a journey through the absent Island of Adakale on the Danube, which materializes in a publication and a video work titled Constituting an Island (2014).

A preoccupation with space and place are treated formally in two of Etel Adnan’s abstract paintings, which evoke landscapes, Untitled (Beirut) #077 and Untitled (Beirut) #132, and verbally in Ergin Çavuşoğlu’s “Place Series” (2008). Attilla Csörgő’s sketches, Squaring the Circle (2012) are geometric studies evocative of the great architect Sinan’s fascination with placing a circle on top of a square in building a space of community as well as divine communication.

Otto Berchem’s tent-like structure invokes a traditional ritual of community with May Pole (2013), a sculpture piece on which he projects the color abstractions he blocks out from protest signs on black and white photographs of social mobilization across the world through recent history. Cengiz Çekil takes one of the most popular media of the 20th century, and strips it to its bare imagery in his newspaper collage from the series “Unwritten” (1977), opening up alternative readings through images as well as questioning the very credibility of the image itself. Yasemin Özcan’s Soap Opera Synopses, an installation dated 1997, is reconstructed in the back of the gallery space, standing in as a relic from our near history, with a sound that haunts our psyche. Özcan’s intervention into the text, which reflects the socio-political agenda of its time, gives a wonderous contextualization, and a glimpse into the machinations of repetition and change.

The exhibition explores the momentary encounters Frances imagines, in geography, history, and popular media as well as in quotidian and fantastic imaginaries of nature. Ali Taptık’s photographs depicting the urban flora arise from his practice of walking and documenting the minute details of urban landscape. His survey of a variety of frail potted plants scattered throughout the city resonates with Çağdaş Kahriman’s lament for an urban tree in Fenêtre sur cour. Berat Işık’s video duo, Butterfly Effect (2012) and Falling (2013) were produced as two separate pieces. Shown in this exhibition together, the duo explores the transformative potential of breath as the source of human voice. This potential is explored in the breath that is held and let go in Butterfly Effect and the gas filled balloons that are left to roam the skies.

Kiki Smith’s animal drawings from the series “Everywhere” (2010) explore a world which is accessible only through the perception of animals, and remain closed to human beings. Funda Özgünaydın’s human-animal collages depict the hybridization of the species, a strategy that aspires to glimpse into the perceptive range of our co-habitors. Nilbar Güreş’s Spider Woman; Mother (2006), a barely visible piece hanging uncannily from a corner harbors a quiet and unexpected strength, opening up a world not visible to those outside her web.

Bringing together works that twist, open up or change our perception, the exhibition aims to create a space where the secret world that exists right there in public appears as a possibility. The exhibition hails the social movements that will surely leave a mark on the 10s of this century by taking a fresh look at history, geography, architecture, and nature.

Rampa Istanbul

Şair Nedim Caddesi No: 21a
34357 Akaretler Beşiktaş
Istanbul, Turkey

T +90 212 327 0800
info@rampaistanbul.com

Le Mouvement – Performing the City
The 12th edition of the Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in 2014, curated by Gianni Jetzer and Chris Sharp, continues the innovative spirit of the format by offering the most radical edition yet. True to its provocative legacy of 60 years, Le Mouvement will challenge the very definition of public art by creating no sculpture at all. The 12th Swiss Sculpture Exhibition in Biel/Bienne will be solely dedicated to performance.

Symposium with the participation of Jean-Luc Nancy, Bojana Cvejić, Gianni Jetzer, André Lepecki, Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Hans Rudolf Reust, Peter J. Schneemann, Chris Sharp, Thomas Strässle, Jan Verwoert, as well as the artists Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, and Ariana Reines

Le Mouvement is a multipart exhibition, which investigates the nature of sculpture and public space by hosting multiple performances in the town of Biel/Bienne. The show touches upon a variety of inter-related topics and issues, which include:

–The nature and uses of public space
–Art in public space
–The individual and collective body in public space—both static and in movement
–The relationship between the fleeting materiality of the body and the more permanent materiality of sculpture

Rirkrit Tiravanija, "U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller)," 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City
Rirkrit Tiravanija, “U.F.O. – NAUT JK (Július Koller),” 2012. Courtesy of kurimanzutto, Mexico City

Uniting a heterogeneous group of art historians, theorists, curators and artists to discuss these points, the symposium intends to harness the knowledge of these different disciplines in hopes of gaining a greater and more nuanced understanding of performance in public space and the current nature of public space itself.

In co-operation with the Contemporary Art History Department of the University of Bern, Bern, and Y Institute of the Bern University of the Arts (BUA), Bern

Symposium in English
French translation provided / Admission is free / Limited seating, please reserve symposium@lemouvement.ch

Press contact
Patrick Steffen, patrick.steffen@ess-spa.ch

Upcoming programming:
Saturday, August 30 and Sunday, August 31, all three movements in parallel

Mouvement I – Sculptures on the Move
July 4–August 31

With reconfigured sculptures by Olivier Mosset, Franz Eggenschwiler, Carl Burckhardt, Max Bill and performances by Alex Cecchetti, Christian Jankowski, Marko Lulić, Ariana Reines

Mouvement II – Performing the City
August 26–31

With performances in public space by luciana achugar, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Nina Beier, Trisha Brown, Pablo Bronstein, Eglè Budvytytè, Willi Dorner, Douglas Dunn, Simone Forti, Alicia Frankovich, Maria Hassabi, San Keller, Köppl/Začek, Jirí Kovanda, Germaine Kruip, Liz Magic Laser, Myriam Lefkowitz, Jérôme Leuba, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Alexandra Pirici, Prinz Gholam, Lin Yilin

Mouvement III – The City Performed
August 30–November 2
Opening: August 30, 5pm
Kunsthaus CentrePasquArt, Biel/Bienne

Vito Acconci, Francis Alÿs, Pablo Bronstein, Stanley Brouwn, Trisha Brown, Paulo Bruscky, Martin Creed, Felipe Ehrenberg, VALIE EXPORT, Dara Friedman, Gelitin, Tomislav Gotovac, Alberto Greco, Anna Halprin, Maria Hassabi, Noritoshi Hirakawa, Sanja Iveković, Christian Jankowski, Jirí Kovanda, Liz Magic Laser, Klara Lidén, Marko Lulić, Babette Mangolte, Rachel Mason, Dave McKenzie, Dieter Meier, Ocaña, Neša Paripović, Ewa Partum, Alexandra Pirici, Miervaldis Polis, Kim Sooja, Mladen Stilinović, Beat Streuli, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ulla von Brandenburg, Ai Weiwei

For further information, please contact info@lemouvement.ch

National conference on socially engaged art
November 6–8, 2014

Call for participation
Proposal deadline: July 14, 2014

Cleveland Institute of Art
11141 East Boulevard
Cleveland, OH 44106

unruly_cfp

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Are we talking about art that resists the conventional structures of the art world and re-imagines a new, unwieldy public sphere of social activism in the face of media spectacle and profit motives? Or can social practices in art reconcile aesthetic focus with external forces or agencies with regard for communities, perhaps affecting a timely catalyst for change? The recent spate of publications on what has been variously called community-based art, participatory art, collaborative art, relational art, social practice or socially engaged art, indicates that such questions have provoked a variety of studies that intellectually tackle what Shannon Jackson has noted as the “social turn.”

This conference, “Unruly Engagements: On the Social Turn in Contemporary Art and Design,” proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades or so. Among our primary objectives is to facilitate public discourse on the feasibility of interventionist projects in art and design in urban environments, with special attention to “rust-belt” cities like Cleveland.

We invite presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

–Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
–Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
–Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
–Urban design and design in the city as force for change
–Aesthetics, ethics and politics
–Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF-formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to:
Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira, unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Conference schedule and registration details will be posted in early autumn.

“Unruly Engagements” is a key component of Community Works: Artist as Social Agent, CIA’s yearlong commitment to exploring social agency and the visual arts.

The deadline for proposals is July 14.

About Shannon Jackson
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is Professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center. Professor Jackson was recently selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship for 2014–15. Her most recent book is Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge, 2011), and she is working on a book about The Builders Association. Her previous books are Lines of Activity: Performance, Historiography, and Hull-House Domesticity (2000) and Professing Performance: Theatre in the Academy from Philology to Performativity (2004).

About Cleveland Institute of Art
Founded in 1882, the Cleveland Institute of Art is an accredited, independent college of art and design offering 15 majors in studio art, digital art, craft disciplines, and design. CIA extends its programming to the public through gallery exhibitions; lectures; a robust continuing education program; and the Cinematheque, a year-round art and independent film program. For more information visit cia.edu.

Faena Arts Center, Buenos Aires announces exhibitions of distinguished international artists Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich and Agustina Woodgate at the historic flour mill-turned-arts center.

Within the rich architectural and historical backdrop of the Faena Arts Center, Russian artist Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich will present a multi-layered performance piece in the Los Molinos Room, while Argentinian artist Agustina Woodgate will present a new site-specific work that will surpass the walls of the arts center and spill into the city with urban interventions. Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Fyodor’s Performance Carousel and Agustina Woodgate: GPS / Poetic Social Geometry is on view May 20 – June 8.

Faena_Arts

Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Carousel
Pavlov-Andreevich’s Carousel

consists of a spectacular circular stage divided into nine parts, which will be installed for the first time in FAC’s Los Molinos Room. As it revolves, the carousel unveils various individual performances, challenging the usual concept of space and time in the visual arts. In his use of dizzying speed, which seeks to break the boundary of purely aesthetic experience, the artist pays homage to the Soviet movement known in the West as “Down with Shame,” which organized nudist marches and evenings to sweep away bourgeois morality. His work spans various media and disciplines, delving into the relationship between the hidden and the conspicuous, while emphasizing the communication between an artist and his public, and the role of rituals in the visual arts.

Born in Moscow, Pavlov-Andreevich divides his time between his native city, London, and São Paulo. His major works include My Mouth Is A Temple (2009, part of Marina Abramovic Presents at the Manchester International Festival, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Maria Balshaw); Hygiene (2009, Deitch Projects, New York); and Egobox (2010, curated by Klaus Biesenbach and RoseLee Goldberg).

GPS / Poetic Social Geometry
Agustina Woodgate was born in Buenos Aires and has lived in the United States for over a decade. Her work explores and encourages collective human encounters, rather than individual contemplation of produced objects. Her interdisciplinary and site-specific work GPS / Poetic Social Geometry will burst out from the confines of the Cathedral Room, with performances and interventions in the public spaces surrounding the installation itself, where visitors will encounter ordinary objects worn down or altered to the point of being intriguingly unrecognizable.

Following her graduation from the National University Institute of Art (IUNA) in 2004, Woodgate moved to Miami, where she developed an artistic practice that combines disciplines like textile art and street performance. Her individual projects include Organic (2005, Liquid Blue Gallery, Miami), Letting Down (2008, Spinello Gallery, Miami), Endlessly Falling (2009, Dimensions Variable, Miami), Growing Up (2010, Miami-Dade Public Library, Miami), If These Walls Could Talk (2011, Spinello Projects, Miami), New Landscapes (2012, Art Basel Miami Beach, Miami), and Rugs (2014, Arts and Culture Center of Hollywood, Florida).

Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich: Carousel
May 20–26, 2014

Agustina Woodgate: GPS / Poetic Social Geometry
May 20–June 8, 2014

Opening: May 20

Faena Arts Center
Aimé Paine 1169
Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires
Argentina (1137)
Hours: Saturday–Monday noon–7pm

T +4010 9233

faena.com/artscenter

Faena Arts Center Buenos Aires
Under the guidance and overarching vision of Director/Chief Curator Ximena Caminos, the FAC is a center for arts and artistic experimentation, which presents groundbreaking site-specific installations and generates ideas and conversation with the international contemporary art world, and within its surrounding community of Buenos Aires. With 4,000 square meters of exhibition space in an emblematic turn-of-the-century building, the FAC fosters and encourages bold creativity on a monumental scale and is the heart and soul of the art district. The FAC is generously supported in its mission by HSBC and Citroën.

Inaugurated in 2011, the Faena Art Center has commissioned avant-garde artists to envision and realize major site-specific works, such as O bicho suspenso na paisagem, by Ernesto Neto (September 2011); Los Carpinteros by the Cuban collective of the same name (May 2012); Walking South by Franz Ackermann (November 2012); and The liminal space trilogy by the Russian collective AES+F (May 2013).

The New York  School of Visual Arts is pleased to present two innovative summer residencies in public art, which introduce artists to the conceptual and practical considerations of expanding a studio practice into the public realm. Both programs are open to artists interested in moving from the traditional studio, gallery and theatre space into the urban arena. Visual artists, writers, architects, designers, performance artists, urban planners and social activists are invited to apply.

Summer public art residencies

School of Visual Arts (SVA)

Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.
Kirsten Hurley, Women in Tall Dresses, 2011. Site-specific performance on 23rd Street in New York City. Photo by Keren Moscovitch.

City as Site: Public Art as Social Intervention
June 16–27, 2014
City as Site is a nomadic summer residency that explores the diverse communities that define New York City with the aim of creating site-specific public works and brings together artists, scholars and community members to think about the role of art in constructing space for civic dialogue. Participants will develop experimental models for an artistic practice that combine methods from the arts, activism, and other fields in order to cultivate innovative approaches to the construction of social spaces as works of art.

The residency will use New York City’s five boroughs as its classroom, engaging with its communities, histories and stories as materials for final projects. Interventions may take the form of tours, temporal installations, video or sound projections, performances, community involved projects, peer-to-peer platforms, print or online publication, or a one-time street event.

A faculty composed of leading artists and social entrepreneurs will help artists originate projects that reflect current social issues and guide collaborations with local businesses and neighborhoods, as well as cultural and governmental partners.

Faculty and guest lecturers will include Ofri Cnaani (visual artist), Kendal Henry (public art, urban design consultant; visual artist; curator), Ed Woodham (artist, founder and director, Art in Odd Places), Rachel Falcone & Michael Premo (Housing is a Human Right), Tom Finkelpearl (Queens Museum), Lisa Kim (Two Trees), Micaela Martegani (More Art), Jenny Polak (artist and activist), Todd Shalom (Elastic City), Radhika Subramaniam (Parsons The New School for Design), Charlie Todd (Improv Everywhere), Risë Wilson (The Laundromat Project & Robert Rauschenberg Foundation), Caroline Woolard (Our Goods & Trade School).

Reconfiguring Site: Art, Architecture and Activism in the Public Realm
July 14–26, 2014
Making art in the public is no longer just placing an object in a public plaza, a monumental sculpture in a park or a memorial sculpture. Public art can be integrated into the landscape or digitally into the fabric of a building. It can be performative, ephemeral, digital or permanent. Many artists would like to make art in the public but feel overwhelmed by its challenges or by what is often seen as a compromise of one’s creative freedom. The restrictions imposed by a commissioning agency, as well as limitations of liability, money and recognition can also be confining for an artist.

This program is structured as a think-tank for public art. Participants will learn how to read from architectural plans and create an ephemeral work in the streets or a temporary work at a site suggested within NYC. Perfecting an existing proposal or developing one that can be realized at a later time will also be fundamental. In acknowledgement of the increasing threat of global warming, this summer’s residency will focus on the waterfront. Art and architecture serve integral functions in the redevelopment of waterfront areas, which have been affected by climate change. Residents will be encouraged to develop professional proposals, which engage a New York City-based waterfront site under the guidance of faculty members and guest lecturers.

Core faculty will include an artist, a public art curator/administrator and an urban planner/architect. Leading public art administrators will be among the guest speakers in the residency. Faculty and lecturers have included Charlotte Cohen, Craig Dykers, Eiko and Koma, Wendy Feuer, Anita Glesta, Kendal Henry, Barry Holden, Meredith Johnson, Anne Pasternak, Lauren Ross, Krzysztof Wodiczko and Nina Yankowitz.

For further information or questions regarding SVA’s summer residencies:
residency@sva.edu / T +1 212 592 2188.

Pratt institute presents A Community Exchange: The Socially Engaged Artist and the Public Imagination

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 1:30–5pm

Pratt institute
Higgins Hall
1 St. James Place
Brooklyn, New York 11205

www.pratt.edu/academics/art_design

Pratt_InstituteJoin us as we explore the role of the public in socially engaged art. What is the public’s imagination in relationship to social engagement and its potential within the society we inhabit? What is the nature of the public’s commitment to space and place, and how is it related to a social engagement that formulates new social imaginaries? This conversation will explore these questions and discuss the place of socially engaged art in our many publics.

Introduction: Ann Messner, Adjunct Professor of Fine Arts, Pratt Institute
Artist and activist Ann Messner has consistently challenged the unresolved schisms between notions of private life/space and public/civic experience, focusing on the relationship between the individual and the larger social body within public discourse. Ann was a key player in The Real Estate Show, breaking ground as one of the first art shows to expose the inequities of real estate in New York. More recently she critically analyzed the “war on terror” through a series of tabloid and video works created with direct-action collective A.R.T. Meteor, her 1980 public intervention in Times Square, presaged our current age of technological reliance and interconnectedness.


Facilitator Shane Aslan Selzer
(artist, organizer and writer) develops micro-communities where visual artists can expand on larger social issues and deal with generosity, exchange, and failure. In each of these projects she assembles spaces where people can learn through interaction with others by provoking discourse that is informed by circumstances that are too often held “outside” of art. She is co-editor with Ted Purves of What We Want Is Free: Critical Exchanges in Recent Art (SUNY Press, 2014).


Panelists
Jaret Vadera, an artist and cultural producer based in Brooklyn, explores the poetics of translation and the politics of vision through his interdisciplinary art practice. Jaret has concurrently worked as an organizer, programmer, curator, educator, editor, writer, and designer for socially engaged organizations that focus on using art as a catalyst for social change, including Community Arts Ontario, Rush Arts Gallery, and Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art.

May Joseph, Professor of Global Studies, Pratt Institute, teaches urbanism, global studies and visual culture. In her recently published book Fluid New York (Duke University Press, 2013), Joseph describes the many ways that New York, and New Yorkers, have begun to incorporate the city’s archipelago ecology into plans for a livable and sustainable future. Joseph suggests that New York’s future lies in the reclamation of its great water resourcesfor artistic creativity, civic engagement and ecological sustainability.

Keynote
Rick Lowe, artist, activist, and founder of Project Row Houses, a neighborhood-based nonprofit art and cultural organization in Houston’s Northern Third Ward, one of the city’s oldest African-American communities.

PRH began in 1993 as a result of discussions among African-American artists who wanted to establish a positive, creative presence in their own community. Among Rick’s honors are Rudy Bruner Awards in Urban Excellence; AIA Keystone Award; Heinz Award in the arts and humanities; Loeb Fellow at Harvard University; Mel King Fellow at MIT; Skowhegan Governor’s Award; Skandalaris Award for Art/Architecture; and USA Artists Booth Fellow. President Barack Obama appointed Rick to the National Council on the Arts in 2013.

Support for the event provided by the Deans of the School of Art and Design and School of Liberal Arts and Sciences to encourage cross-campus collaboration and sponsored by the Departments of Fine Arts, Art and Design Education, and the Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies. Event coordinated by Heather Lewis, Associate Professor, Art and Design Education; Ann Messner, Adjunct Professor Fine Arts; and Uzma Rizvi, Assistant Professor Social Science & Cultural Studies.

The 12th Bienal de Cuenca is conceived as an open thought process, in which the artworks form a constellation of independent yet deeply interrelated concepts. Informed by Édouard Glissant’s (Martinica, 1928–Paris, 2011) understanding of knowledge as stemming from movement and relation, the Bienal addresses the suspension of the privileged condition of the artist.

In some cases, this results in nomadic artworks, not only because of their physical movement, but also through the outsourcing of creative production to the point of following an almost industrial modus operandi. In other cases, artists recuperate traditional know-how, by working with craftsmen or rescuing fables and forgotten stories, or they reinterpret already existing works and even collaborate with spirits and other-than-human beings. The dissolution of the border between the conceptual and the physical author undermines the bases of economic, geographic and political status quos, often referring, in more or less direct ways, to postcolonial debates and the need to undermine market logic. Problematizing those issues, other artists question the validity of standard and universal measurements of time and space, and point to the impossibility of reducing the world to uniform criteria.

Sara VanDerBeek, "Untitled," 2014. Digital C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures gallery
Sara VanDerBeek, “Untitled,” 2014. Digital
C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Metro
Pictures galleryIr para volver (Leaving to Return)

12th Bienal de Cuenca
March 28–June 27, 2014

Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca
Bolívar 13-89 y Estévez de Toral
Cuenca
Ecuador
T +593 7 2831 778

The title of the exhibition is based on the Ecuadorian expression Ir para volver (Leaving to return), which describes a physical and temporary absence (frequently even without a definite duration). While highlighting the state of movement as the key aspect of many artworks included in the exhibition, this expression also situates the 12th Bienal de Cuenca in the undefined field of speech, emphasizing the importance of dialogue and of the mixture of apparently distant, disparate, and even opposed forms of knowledge. Leaving to Return signals an ongoing dialogue that takes place far away from the rigidity of strict and polished discourses, and ultimately delves into life itself.

Dialogues, the discursive program of Leaving to Return, is structured around four of the main concepts of the exhibition. Nabil Ahmed, Sarah Demeuse, Max Jorge Hinderer and Manuel Segade were invited to organize the four table of discussion. On the final day of the program, architect Paulo Tavares will moderate a session that will explore the relation between the topics and the questions raised in the previous days, and articulate a collective dialogue.

Participants:

Residency program, September 2013–June 2014:
Agency, Helen Mirra, Eduardo Navarro, Julia Rometti and Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Sara VanDerBeek

Exhibition, March 28–June 27:
Agency, Meriç Algün Ringborg, Armando Andrade Tudela, Julieta Aranda, Martha Araújo, Adrián Balseca, Alessandro Balteo Yazbeck, Néstor Basterretxea, François Bucher, Mauricio Bueno, Saskia Calderón, Pia Camil, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Juan Downey, Patricia Esquivias, Mario García Torres, Ximena Garrido Lecca, José Hidalgo-Anastacio, Runo Lagomarsino, Little Warsaw, Maria Loboda, Claudia Martínez Garay, Benjamin Meyer-Krahmer, Ana Maria Millán, Helen Mirra, Felipe Mujica, Eduardo Navarro, Rivane Neuenschwander, Pedro Neves Marques, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Bernardo Ortiz, Adrian Paci, Rita Ponce de León, Mauro Restiffe, Manuela Ribadeneira, Julia Rometti y Victor Costales, Jorge Satorre, Marinella Senatore, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané, Cecilia Szalkowicz, Sara VanDerBeek

Performances, March 28–30:
Saskia Calderón, Juan Pablo Ordóñez, Marinella Senatore

Dialogues, March 29–31:
“Table 1—History, Body, and Aesthetic Condition”: Valeria Coronel, Carles Guerra, Max Jorge Hinderer Cruz
“Table 2—Appropriation”: Pierre Bal-Blanc, Christian León, Manuel Segade
“Table 3—Of Men and Measure”: Sarah Demeuse, Fernanda Laguna, Alexander Provan
“Table 4—Material Movement: Forests”: Nabil Ahmed, Mario Melo, Nancy Lee Peluso;
Discussion: Paulo Tavares

Curators: Jacopo Crivelli Visconti (curator), Manuela Moscoso (adjunct curator)

Director of the Fundación Municipal Bienal de Cuenca: Katya Cazar

Venues: Museo de Arte Moderno; Salón del Pueblo; Proceso Arte Contemporáneo; Casa de los Arcos; Capilla del Museo de la Medicina; Colegio Benigno Malo

Media contact: Sebastián Lazo, comunicacion@bienaldecuenca.org

Mischa Kuball
Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl)

23 March–December 2014

Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl
Creiler Platz 1, Rathaus
D-45768 Marl, Germany

www.skulpturenmuseum-glaskasten-marl.de

Mischa Kuball’s public intervention Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl) both provokes and quotes Charles Baudelaire, yet at the same time, offers possibilities for identification for the inhabitants of Marl, who will be participating and are invited to bring along flowers: participation and discussion are the project’s two non-material components. The distinctive logo made up of white illuminated letters positioned high above the museum on the upper edge of the Town Hall’s façade becomes a kind of signpost, visible from afar, to the Sculpture Museum and the large vase of flowers on the left adjacent to the stairs is to be understood as an invitation to the townsfolk to bring along the aforementioned flowers for Marl and to put them in this prominently placed receptacle. It is situated immediately next to the stairs to the Register Office in the upper floor of the Town Hall—plenty of reasons then for bringing flowers! The vase and its contents will be tended by employees from the Sculpture Museum.

Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.
Mischa Kuball, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Flowers for Marl). © Archive Mischa Kuball.

Mischa Kuball, conceptual artist, has developed a site-specific concept which he calls a “public preposition,” or in other words, suggestions and ideas for the public and for public space. The installation itself, planned as a temporary artwork, could also become a more permanent fixture; the artist would like to determine the actual duration of the installation in consultation with the people of Marl.

In the form of his project series “public prepositions,” Mischa Kuball repeatedly poses the question of the contemporary definition of public art within an extended context. He always begins with a precise analysis of the site where the interventions are to take place, and this approach includes an engagement with the public which has become an established feature of his artistic position.

Every place has its social and political peculiarities which the artist incorporates into his planning. His works tend to be temporary because they are geared towards the potential of an altered perception of seemingly familiar urban contexts.

Mischa Kuball has realised such concepts in different cities at home and abroad, including the work Intervento in the Caserma Cornoldi in Venice, as well as his Marfa Floater, silver / gold in Marfa, Texas, GhostTram in Katowice, Poland and his current contribution solidarity grid in Christchurch, New Zealand as part of the SCAPE Public Art Christchurch Biennial. A total of over fifteen comparable “public preposition” projects are to be published in book format, which means that the intervention in Marl will rub shoulders with works in an international context.

This project was kindly supported by the Ministry for Families, Children, Youth, Culture and Sports of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, the City of Marl and realised by Elektro Decker, Essen.

Mischa Kuball
Born in 1959 in Düsseldorf, Germany, lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany

Mischa Kuball has been working since 1984 in public and museum-based spaces. Using light in installations and photography, he explores architectural spaces and their social and political discourses. He reflects a full range of differing facets from cultural social structures all the way to architectural interventions that highlight or recode the overall emblematic character and architectural/historical context. Public and private space coalesce in his political, participatory projects. They enable a form of communication between participants, the artist himself, the artwork and urban space.

Since 2007, Mischa Kuball has been professor for media art at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne where he founded the -1/MinusEins Experimentallabor (Experimental Laboratory).

For more information: www.mischakuball.com

Press contact: skulpturenmuseum@marl.de